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Hispanic/Latinos in Wisconsin


Health Facts

All external hyperlinks are provided for your information and for the benefit of the general public. The Department of Health Services does not testify to, sponsor, or endorse the accuracy of the information provided on externally linked pages.

Chronic Disease1

  • During the years 2001-2005, the three leading causes of death among Hispanics/Latinos in Wisconsin were cancer, heart disease, and unintentional injury. 
  • Cancer caused 19 percent of Hispanic/Latino deaths in Wisconsin, and heart disease caused 15 percent.
  • Latinos in Wisconsin have lower rates of death and hospitalization from heart disease, compared to the total Wisconsin population.
  • In 2001-2005, the age-adjusted mortality rate from heart disease was 80 deaths per 100,000 population among Hispanics/Latinos, compared to 202 per 100,000 in the total Wisconsin population.
  • Both male and female Hispanics/Latinos have lower rates of heart disease hospitalization compared to their counterparts in the total population.
  • In 2001-2005, the age-adjusted cancer mortality rate for Hispanic/Latinos was 82 deaths per 100,000 population, compared to 184 per 100,000 for the total Wisconsin population.
  • Hispanics/Latinos in Wisconsin have a higher rate of death from diabetes, compared to the total Wisconsin population.

HIV/AIDS2 

  • Hispanics/Latinos bear a disproportionate share of the burden of HIV/AIDS in Wisconsin. Hispanic/Latinos accounted for 13.1 percent of new cases of HIV infection in 2001-2005, while making up about 4 percent of the total Wisconsin population.
  • During the 2001-2005 period, Hispanic/Latinos accounted for 13.1 percent of newly reported cases of HIV infection among males and 12.9 percent of new cases among females.

Health Risk Factors3

  • An estimated 24 percent of Hispanic/Latino adults in Wisconsin smoke cigarettes, based on survey results for 2001-2005. This was not significantly different from the percentage who reported smoking in the total adult population (22%). 
  • Hispanic/Latino adults reported levels of alcohol use similar to those reported by the total adult population of Wisconsin. For example, the percentage of Hispanic/Latinos who reported binge drinking (28%) was not significantly different from the percentage reported by the total population (24%).
  • Nearly half of Hispanic/Latino adults (48%) reported they were physically inactive in terms of leisure-time activity. This was not significantly different from the proportion reported by the total adult population (45%).
  • Nearly two-thirds of Hispanic/Latino adults (65 percent) were overweight or obese, compared to 60 percent of the total population.

Health Care4

  • Based on Wisconsin Family Health Survey results for 2001-2005, Hispanics/Latinos were less likely than the total population to have health insurance at any given point in time. Seventy-seven percent of Hispanic/Latinos, compared with 93 percent of the total Wisconsin population, said they had some form of health insurance at the time of the survey interview.
  • Nearly one-quarter (23%) of Hispanics/Latinos were uninsured at the time of the survey interview. This was nearly four times the percentage uninsured in the total Wisconsin population (6%).
  • Another measure of health insurance coverage is coverage over the year preceding the survey interview (coverage over "the past year"). Nineteen percent of Hispanic/Latinos were uninsured for all of the past year; this is nearly five times the percent in the total state population (4%).
  • Another 10 percent of Hispanics/Latinos had been insured for only part of the past year, meaning they were uninsured for part of the year.

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Citations:

  1. Minority Health Report, 2001-2005.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

Additional Information About Hispanic/Latinos in Wisconsin:

  • More information on Hispanic/Latino population estimates is available from an interactive data query system, Wisconsin Interactive Statistics on Health (WISH), on the Wisconsin Department of Health Services site.
  • A synopsis of health-related findings about Hispanic/Latinos in Wisconsin is found in the Department's Wisconsin Minority Health Report, 2001-2005 (PDF, 897 KB).
  • Latinos in Wisconsin: A Statistical Overview presents demographic information on the state’s Hispanic or Latino population. The report relies principally on data from the 2010 Census and estimates from 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) to create a statistical portrait of Latinos in Wisconsin and draw comparisons with Wisconsin’s total population in a series of charts, maps, and tables. Thematically the report focuses on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the Latino population such as size and distribution, age structure, composition of households and families, education, income and poverty, employment, housing, and health care. In a few instances the report includes time-series data with the results of earlier Censuses. To supplement Census and ACS data sources, the report also draws on data from the Wisconsin Departments of Health Services and of Public Instruction.

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All external hyperlinks are provided for your information and for the benefit of the general public. The Department of Health Services does not testify to, sponsor, or endorse the accuracy of the information provided on externally linked pages.

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Last Revised: October 17, 2014