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Study Guides 
Lead Supervisor

There are 100-items on the lead (Pb) supervisor exam.  The exam covers the general topic areas (a through j) below. The specific knowledge areas listed under each topic are guides for your study activities in each topic. The course manual from your initial lead (Pb) supervisor course, and materials from any refresher courses you have taken, should provide most of the information needed to help you study for the exam.  In addition, the exam includes questions about applicable OSHA lead in construction regulations.  It is recommended that an 8 hour OSHA construction regulations course is taken in preparation for the exam.  Exam times and locations vary.

(a) Background Information on Lead:

  • Give examples of "lead-based paint hazards" and other common sources of lead in residential environments
  • Identify locations where lead hazards typically exist in residential environments

(b) Health Effects of Lead Exposure:

  • Describe how children are typically exposed to lead
  • Identify the common routes of worker lead exposure
  • Describe the basic health effects of lead to workers

(c) Information and Training:

  • Describe the OSHA and other recommended requirements for lead-abatement worker training

(d) Background Information on Federal, State, and Local Government Regulations and Guidance that Pertain to Lead-Based Paint and Lead-Based Paint Activities:

  • Describe the RCRA (40 CFR 262) regulations and related information regarding waste disposal for lead-abatement projects
  • Identify the RCRA definitions of hazardous waste and testing procedures
  • Describe a "competent person for health and safety" as defined by OSHA (29 CFR 1926.62)
  • Describe the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standards (29 CFR 1910.134) relevant to lead-abatement work [not fits or lead-specific]
  • Describe the OSHA General Industry Standards (29 CFR 1910) relevant to lead abatement work
  • Describe the OSHA Construction Standards (29 CFR 1926) [other than lead regs]
  • Describe the general requirements specified by the OSHA Lead in Construction Standards (29 CFR 1926.62)
  • Describe the exposure monitoring and written compliance plan requirements specified by the OSHA Lead in Construction Standards (29 CFR 1926.62)
  • Describe the OSHA Hazard Communication Standards (HAZCOM) (29 CFR 1926.59) relevant to lead abatement work
  • Identify the OSHA Action Level and Permissible Exposure Level for lead
  • Recognize the units used to express lead levels in air, soil, and dust
  • Identify the HUD and EPA post-abatement clearance standards for lead in dust
  • Describe the purpose and focus of the HUD guidelines
  • Explain why it is important to check that worker licenses and certificates are current
  • Discuss Wisconsin HFS 163 certification requirements
  • Describe Wisconsin HFS 163 definition of abatement.
  • Describe Wisconsin HFS 163 definition of lead-based paint or LBP
  • Explain Wisconsin HFS 163 lead abatement or other lead hazard reduction activities notification requirements
  • Indicate which Wisconsin regulation covers lead (Pb) training and certification
  • Describe Wisconsin HFS 163 definition of interim control activity
  • Identify the State agency that regulates solid waste storage, transportation and disposal
  • Identify which certified personnel Wisconsin HFS 163 authorizes to perform clearance
  • Identify the certified personnel Wisconsin HFS 163 requires to be at the lead (Pb) abatement site at all times
  • Explain who owns the certification card
  • Identify the certified personnel who may conduct lead inspections, write inspection reports and conduct clearance following a lead hazard reduction activity
  • Identify the certified personnel who may conduct lead inspections, write inspection reports, conduct clearance, conduct lead hazard screens and provide options to reduce specific lead hazards
  • Identify the certified personnel who may oversee or perform on-site lead abatement and HUD LBP grant-funded lead hazard reduction activities, develop occupant protection plans and write abatement reports

(e) Personal Protective Equipment:

  • Name the types of respirators typically needed for residential lead abatement jobs and describe protection (fit) factors
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and obtain personal protective equipment needed for workers during the project [not respirators]
  • Describe how to care for and store respirators properly
  • Describe the types of worker respiratory fit tests
  • Describe the conditions that may effect worker respiratory fit tests
  • Recognize when personal protective clothing and equipment are needed and properly used [not respirators]

(f) Lead Hazard Reduction Methods:

  • Describe the recommended chemical paint removal methods
  • Describe the recommended on-site mechanical paint removal methods
  • Describe the recommended component removal, enclosure, and encapsulation methods
  • Identify the materials and methods used for enclosure
  • Identify the materials and methods used for encapsulation
  • Describe how to abate and control lead in exterior dust
  • Describe how to abate and control lead in soil
  • Explain why open torch burning or heat guns operated above 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit are prohibited by the Federal government
  • Give examples of restricted paint abatement methods
  • Describe how to build containment for interior abatement work
  • Describe how to build containment for exterior abatement work
  • Describe the correct locations of lead warning signs
  • Recognize the correct wording of lead warning signs used to establish regulated areas
  • Explain how to perform final cleanup procedures properly [not order]
  • Describe the proper order for final cleanup
  • Describe when abated surfaces should be painted or otherwise sealed
  • Describe the need and techniques to perform daily cleanup in abatement areas
  • Give examples of techniques and equipment used to abate interior dust
  • Describe interior dust abatement strategies for rooms and entire dwellings
  • Recognize the limitations of abating lead dust from severely contaminated carpets
  • Describe how to package and label hazardous waste
  • Explain why encapsulation may fail
  • Describe dust sampling techniques and strategies for clearance sampling

(g) Construction Terminology:

  • Give examples of basic building and architecture components
  • Identify window troughs (wells) and interior windowsills (stools)

(h) Hazard Recognition and Control:

  • Identify fire and electrical hazards and suggest ways to prevent them
  • Identify slip, trip, and fall hazards and suggest ways to prevent them
  • Identify heat-related health hazards and suggest ways to prevent them
  • Explain why it may be important to collect pre-abatement (baseline) soil or exterior dust samples
  • Explain why it may be important to collect pre-abatement (baseline) dust samples
  • Explain why it is important to examine worker baseline blood-lead levels
  • Explain why air-sampling pumps need to be calibrated before use
  • Explain why personal air-sampling is required to assess workersí lead exposure
  • Give examples of air-sampling strategies
  • Describe potential health hazards from chemicals used on the job and recommend ways to prevent exposure
  • Identify material safety data sheets (MSDS) needed at the worksite
  • Explain methods to prevent workers from taking lead dust home
  • Explain why it is important to shut down and seal the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
  • Explain why it is important to set up a decontamination unit for workers
  • Explain why it is necessary for copies of the health and safety program to be present at the worksite
  • Describe the decontamination procedures that should be discussed with workers during routine safety and health meetings
  • Describe general work practice issues that should be discussed with workers during routine safety and health meetings
  • Explain the importance of routinely checking that containment is secure
  • Explain why the containment area may need mechanical ventilation
  • Recognize general issues and responsibilities for worker health and safety
  • Explain why and when the work area should be isolated from residents
  • Describe why a site-specific health and safety program should be developed
  • Identify workers who need to be medically monitored
  • Describe the frequency of medical monitoring of workers
  • Describe when and how monitoring results must be provided to workers
  • Identify the medical monitoring limits
  • Identify equipment that will minimize worker lead exposure
  • Choose abatement methods that will minimize worker lead exposure
  • Identify the proper areas for storing waste material

(i) Project Management:

  • Explain why it is important to review the scope of work
  • List observations that should be made during the initial walk-through of an abatement site
  • Appraise the level of security needed at an abatement site
  • Demonstrate leadership skills: make decisions, motivate workers to work safely, get cooperation from workers
  • Demonstrate supervisory skills: identify which workers are effective, monitor work progress, identify and correct unsafe worker practices
  • Explain how to start up, maintain, and manage a community relations plan
  • Describe different types of contract specifications
  • Describe proper record-keeping practices and requirements for abatement projects
  • Describe the contents of an abatement report, as per the EPA TSCA 402/404 regulations
  • Interpret lead inspection and risk assessment reports
  • Demonstrate the ability to read blueprints
  • Explain the Supervisorís responsibilities for assigning tasks and orienting crew members
  • Identify important non-abatement tasks to assigning crew members
  • Recognize the Supervisorís responsibilities for determining and obtaining equipment and supplies [not PPE]
  • Demonstrate the ability to create and maintain a project budget
  • List the roles and responsibilities of all participants in an abatement project

(j) Legal and Insurance Issues Relating to Abatement:

  • Explain why it may be important to have a "third party" inspector verify that painted surfaces were abated as per the scope of work
  • Explain why it is important to have a "third party" inspector or risk assessor perform final clearance sampling
  • Identify the liability issues involved with lead-abatement work
  • Name the types of insurance applicable to lead abatement
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Last Revised: July 24, 2013