Fireworks Data and Statistics

 Fireworks bursting in air.

The following data and statistics show how important it is to practice safety first when setting off fireworks.

In Wisconsin for years 2016, 2017, and 2018, fireworks statistics show:

In 2018, there were 91 Emergency Department visits caused by fireworks

  • Males accounted for 74% of those visits.
  • Almost, one quarter (23%) were children (ages 0-17).
  • Additionally, there were 16 total hospitalizations due to firework-related injuries in 2018.

 

In 2017, there were 102 Emergency Department visits caused by fireworks.

  • Males accounted for 81% of those visits.
  • Almost one third of those (30%) were children (ages 0-17).
  • Additionally, there were 15 total hospitalizations due to firework-related injuries in 2017.

 

In 2016, there were 118 Emergency Department visits caused by fireworks.

  • Males accounted for 75% of those visits.
  • Almost 1/3 of those (28%) were children (ages 0-17).
  • Additionally, there were 10 hospitalizations were due to firework-related injuries in 2016.
 

On the national level, fireworks statistics show:

  • In 2013, fireworks caused an estimated 15,600 reported fires in the U.S., including 1,400 structure fires, 200 vehicle fires, and 14,000 outside and other fires. These fires resulted in an estimated 30 civilian injuries and $21 million in direct property damage, with no reported fire deaths. Fire Analysis and Research, Fireworks Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • In 2014, according to the National Fire Protection Association, 10,500 fireworks-related injuries were treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms.

    • More than one-third (35%) of the victims of fireworks injuries were under age 15. Nine percent were under age 5.

    • Males accounted for almost three quarters (74%) of fireworks injuries.

    • A little more than half (51%) of fireworks injuries in 2014 were to extremities—hand or finger (36%), leg (10%), and arm, shoulder, or wrist (5%). Most of the rest (38% of total) were to parts of the head, including the eye (19% of total).

    • 8 out of 9 (85%) emergency room fireworks injuries involved fireworks that Federal regulations permit consumers to use. Sparklers, fountains, and novelties alone accounted for more than one-third (38%) of emergency room fireworks injuries.

  • In 2014, an estimated 15,600 reported fires were started by fireworks. These fires resulted in an estimated 30 civilian injuries and $21 million in direct property damage, with no reported fire deaths. Fireworks by Marty Ahrens, June 2016 (PDF)

  • During 2009-2013, 91% of the average of 16,900 fires associated with fireworks per year occurred outside any structure or vehicle. The largest numbers of these outdoor fires associated with fireworks involved grass fires (6,800 per year), brush fires (3,900), dumpster fires (1,700), unclassified or unknown-type natural or vegetation fires (1,100) and other outside trash, rubbish, or waste fires (1,200).

  • In 2009-2013, two people per year were killed in fires started by fireworks, while data from death certificates show that five people per year were killed directly by fireworks. These estimates may overlap, because fireworks can directly kill someone while also starting a fatal fire.

  • Using 2000-2010 data, the risk of fire death relative to hours of usage is higher for fireworks than for cigarettes.

  • On Independence Day in a typical year, fireworks account for two out of five of all reported fires, more than any other cause of fire.

Last Revised: June 24, 2019