Environmental Public Health Tracking: Toxic Air Emissions Data

Wisconsin Tracking hosts data on toxic air emissions in Wisconsin. When an industry releases air that is potentially cancer-causing (carcinogenic) or possibly unsafe for our health, its release is reported to both the state and federal government.

Industries that release these emissions above certain levels report the amount released each year to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). We get our data directly from the DNR.

Access the toxic air emissions data

Visit our air quality data page for more information about the air pollution data we host. To learn more about other types of air pollution, visit the air quality issues page.

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Frequently asked questions

What are toxic air emissions?

Emissions are substances released into the air. The data we host reflect emissions from stationary industrial activities such as manufacturing. When emissions have the potential to cause harm to humans, they are called toxic air emissions.

How do people come in contact with toxic air emissions?

We can come in contact with toxic air emissions by breathing in polluted air or breathing in polluted dust particles.

What are the health effects of toxic air emissions?

We host data on emissions that are associated with a variety of health issues, including cancer. However, the level of exposure and length of time needed to cause cancer are not fully understood. It is likely that for most people environmental factors – such as emissions – play a smaller role in cancer than other factors, such as genetics and personal behaviors, but emissions are still an important risk to consider.

Scientists estimate between 4% and 19% of cancers are related to environmental factors. Breathing problems, kidney failure, heart failure, infertility, and birth defects can also result from coming in contact with emissions. Finally, factors often work together to increase risk. For instance, genetics, personal behavior, and environmental factors could all increase an individual’s risk of cancer.  Social determinants of health also play an important role; for example, low-income communities and communities of color are more likely to face environmental hazards such as living close to a factory.

What can people do to protect themselves from toxic air emissions?

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the United States federal government are all responsible for enforcing toxic air emission laws that help keep us safe. You can also take steps to protect yourself and your family by learning more about specific pollutants and their levels around areas where you live, work, and play. The Wisconsin DNR also has more information on air quality.

Which measures does Wisconsin Tracking have for toxic air emissions?

All toxic air emissions data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. The list of the 37 emissions for which we have data are below, and you can learn more about each of these emissions on our data details page.

  • Acrolein
  • Acrylonitrile
  • Ammonia
  • Arsenic
  • Benzene
  • Benzidine
  • Beryllium
  • 1,3-Butadiene (Butadiene - 1,3)
  • Cadmium
  • Chlorine
  • Chromium (Metals and Other)
  • Chromium (VI)
  • Ethanolamine
  • Ethylbenzene
  • 2-Ethoxyethanol
  • Ethylene Oxide
  • Formaldehyde
  • Hydrogen Sulfide
  • Lead
  • Mercury (Alkyl)
  • Mercury (Aryl)
  • Mercury (Inorganic Forms)
  • Methylene Chloride
  • Naphthalene
  • Nitric Acid
  • Perchloroethylene (PERC)
  • Phenol
  • Phosphoric Acid
  • Stoddard Solvent
  • Styrene (Monomer)
  • Sulfuric Acid
  • Tetrachlorodibenxo-p-dioxin-2,3,7,8 (TCDD)
  • Toluene
  • Trichloroethylene
  • Triethanolamine
  • Vinyl Chloride
  • Xylene

Can I use Wisconsin Tracking data to see if I have been exposed to toxic air emissions?

Measuring the link between disease and toxic air emissions is a complex issue. The data we host are based on reports of emissions received by DNR. The numbers we list on the portal are of the amount of the compound released into the air during the year it was reported. Emissions mix with air and are diffused over time. Given wind and weather patterns, it is not possible to use this data to estimate direct exposure. As such, the data we host cannot be used to look for direct links between cancer and the environment. Instead, toxic air emission information is one of the many pieces of data that helps us assess population-level disease risks.

Where can I find permit information for facilities reporting emissions in my county?

The Wisconsin DNR hosts an Air Management Data Viewer which allows you to view all facilities and their permit information.

Where can I learn more about each toxic air emission?

Visit the toxic air emissions tab on our data details page. Under each type of emission, we linked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) webpage with more information. To learn more about the Wisconsin Air Toxics Rule (NR 445), visit the DNR website.

Toxic air emissions data details

Data Details

Facilities reported

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and represent the number of industrial facilities in a geographic area that have reached or exceeded the reportable level of the contaminants of interest. Note: Facilities from years 2000-2014 that were missing addresses were geocoded retrospectively using the most recent years of data and the facility identification number (FID). This allowed for facilities and reported emissions to be tied to locations at the county and census tract level more accurately. To learn more, visit the Department of Natural Resources website.

Acrolein

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for acrolein is 75 pounds per year (0.0375 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of acrolein emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect pollution sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more, visit the CDC website.

Acrylonitrile

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for acrylonitrile is 13.1 pounds per year (0.00655 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of acrylonitrile emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ammonia

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ammonia is 4,097 pounds per year (2.0485 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ammonia emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Arsenic

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for arsenic, including elemental and inorganic compounds, is 0.207 pounds per year (0.0001035 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of arsenic emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Benzene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for benzene is 114 pounds per year (0.057 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of benzene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Benzidine

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for benzidine is 0.0133 pounds per year (0.00000665 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of benzidine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Beryllium

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for beryllium, including beryllium compounds, is 0.37 pounds per year (0.000185 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of beryllium emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

1,3-Butadiene (Butadiene - 1,3)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for 1,3-Butadiene is 3.17 pounds per year (0.001585 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of 1,3-Butadiene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Cadmium

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for cadmium, including cadmium compounds, is 0.494 pounds per year (0.000247 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of cadmium emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Chlorine

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for chlorine is 341 pounds per year (0.1705 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of chlorine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of chlorine emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county and census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Chromium (metals and other)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for chromium (metals and other) is 118 pounds per year (0.059 tons/year). Chromium (metals and other) includes chromium metals and compounds other than chromium (VI). These data represent the sum total of chromium (metal and other) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Chromium (VI)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Chromium (VI) includes chromium (VI) compounds and particulates, chromic acid mists, and dissolved chromium (VI) aerosols. Among this combination of compounds, the lowest reportable level is 0.074 pounds per year (0.000037 tons/year). The measures on the portal use this value as the threshold for combined chromium (VI). These data represent the sum total of chromium (VI) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ethanolamine

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ethanolamine is 1,763 pounds per year (0.8815 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ethanolamine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ethylbenzene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ethylbenzene is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ethyl benzene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

2-Ethoxyethanol

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for 2-ethoxyethanol (also known as ethylene glycol monoethyl ether, EGEE, or Cellosolve) is 4,336 pounds per year (2.168 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of 2-ethoxyethanol emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ethylene oxide

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ethylene oxide is 10.1 pounds per year (0.00505 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ethylene oxide emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Formaldehyde

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wis. Admin. Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for formaldehyde is 68.3 pounds per year (0.03415 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of formaldehyde emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Hydrogen sulfide

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wis. Admin. Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for hydrogen sulfide is 3,279 pounds per year (1.6395 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of hydrogen sulfide emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Lead

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wis. Admin. Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for lead, including lead (metal) and lead compounds, is 400 pounds per year (0.2 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of lead emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Mercury (alkyl)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for alkyl mercury compounds is 2.35 pounds per year (0.001175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of mercury (alkyl) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Mercury (aryl)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for aryl mercury compounds is 23.5 pounds per year (0.01175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of mercury (aryl) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Mercury (inorganic forms)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for inorganic forms of mercury, including metallic mercury, is 5.88 pounds per year (0.00294 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of mercury (inorganic forms) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and emissions from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Methylene chloride

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for methylene chloride (also known as dichloromethane) is 1,890 pounds per year (0.945 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of methylene chloride emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county and census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Naphthalene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for naphthalene is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of naphthalene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Nitric acid

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for nitric acid is 1,213 pounds per year (0.6065 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of nitric acid emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Perchloroethylene (PERC)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for perchloroethylene (also known as tetrachloroethylene) is 151 pounds per year (0.0755 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of perchloroethylene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Phenol

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for phenol is 4,528 pounds per year (2.264 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of phenol emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Phosphoric acid

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for phosphoric acid is 235 pounds per year (0.1175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of phosphoric acid emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Stoddard solvent

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for Stoddard solvent (also known as mineral spirits) is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of Stoddard solvent emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Styrene (monomer)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for styrene (monomer) is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of styrene (monomer) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Sulfuric acid

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for sulfuric acid is 235 pounds per year (0.1175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of sulfuric acid emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-2,3,7,8 (TCDD)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for TCDD (2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) is 0.00005 pounds per year (0.000000025 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of TCDD emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Toluene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for toluene (also known as toluol) is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of toluene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Trichloroethylene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wis. Admin. Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for trichloroethylene (also known as trichloroethene) is 444 pounds per year (0.222 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of trichloroethylene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Triethanolamine

These data comes from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wis. Admin. Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for triethanolamine is 1,176 pounds per year (0.588 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of triethanolamine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the OSHA website.

Vinyl chloride

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for vinyl chloride is 101 pounds per year (0.0505 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of vinyl chloride emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Xylene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for xylene, including mixtures and isomers, xylol, and dimethyl benzene, is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of xylene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Glossary and definitions of terms

Explore definitions and explanations of terminology found on the portal, like age-adjusted rate and confidence intervals.

Last Revised: August 1, 2022