Better Health Through Proven Programs: Evidence-Based Programs

Senior group of friends exercise

What are "evidence-based" programs?

"Evidenced-Based" is an official designation given by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. To receive this designation, a health program must be proven effective by scientific research showing that it improves health and well-being or prevents illness and injury. Results demonstrating these outcomes must be published in professional journals.

What are these programs like?

Three seniors using a tablet

Many of these programs teach skills and strategies in a group setting, although some are one-on-one or family programs.

In Wisconsin, many are licensed through the Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging, the state’s clearing house for evidence-based health programs.

Local aging units and Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC) are also a good source of information about evidence-based health programs.

The following are examples of evidenced-based programs available through local aging units and ADRCs:

  • Living Well with Chronic Conditions (Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program) proven to improve participants’ ability to manage their conditions, resulting in better health and well-being and fewer days of hospitalization.
    Tomando Control de su Salud is the Spanish-language adaptation of Living Well, proven to have the same results.
  • Healthy Living with Diabetes (Stanford's Diabetes Self-Management Program) is proven to improve participants’ ability to manage diabetes, reduce blood sugar and A1C levels, reduce adverse symptoms of diabetes and decrease emergency department visits and hospitalizations.
    Vivir Saludable con Diabetes (Stanford's Diabetes Self-Management Program—Spanish) is the Spanish-language adaptation of Healthy Living with Diabetes, proven to have the same results.
  • Stepping On Fall Prevention Program helps participants make changes to improve strength and balance and prevent falls, reducing falls and fall-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations.
  • Powerful Tools for Caregivers builds self-care skills and improves caregiver well-being, helping caregivers support loved ones to live at home longer.

How can I find a program in my area?

Senior couple drinking tea while on laptopDetailed information about these core programs and a listing of upcoming offerings around the state are available from the Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging.

Many local aging units and ADRCs offer additional Evidence-Based Health Promotion programs licensed by national agencies (rather than by the Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging).

You can contact your local agency to learn about these programs, including:

For more information, contact the aging unit or ADRC serving your area.

Last Revised: September 13, 2019