COVID-19: K-12 Schools

On August 11, 2022, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated the COVID-19 guidance for community, school, and early childhood education settings. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) supports these updates and is currently working to update its website and materials to reflect these changes.

Group of children eating lunch at school

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, school district leaders across the state have consulted with local and tribal health departments to make difficult decisions as they balance the need for COVID-19 prevention strategies with quality instruction, access to technology, and the challenge of connecting students and families with needed resources like food, special education services, mental health services.

The resources on this page aim to help decision-makers plan, prepare, and respond to COVID-19 in K-12 schools.


Guidance and resources

 Guidance for K-12 schools and ECE programs

The Department of Health Services (DHS) encourages school and early care and education (ECE) program administrators, and local and tribal health departments to use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Operational Guidance for K-12 Schools and Early Care and Education Programs to Support Safe In-Person Learning to ensure the health and safety of students, teachers, and staff.

 

Additional resources from DHS are included below:

 Testing support for Wisconsin schools

DHS will again offer COVID-19 testing through schools for students, teachers and staff for the 2022-2023 school year. This testing program is intended to help K-12 public, private and independent charter schools provide safe and healthy learning environments. More information can be found on the K-12 COVID-19 Testing Program webpage.

 Guidance for hosting on-site vaccination clinics

Schools who want to hold an on-site vaccination clinic for eligible students, staff, and families can communicate their interest to DHS by filling out the vaccination clinic matching survey and learn more on the COVID-19: Vaccine Partner Resources webpage.

 Webinars for school stakeholders and local public health

Frequently asked questions

What everyday prevention strategies should be used to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in schools and ECE programs?

Schools and ECE programs should implement everyday strategies to prevent the spread of a variety of infectious diseases, including COVID-19.

Schools should implement the following strategies, regardless of their county's current COVID-19 community level.

  • Encourage everyone to stay up to date on vaccinations.
  • Encourage people to stay home when sick.
  • Maximize ventilation.
  • Promote proper hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette.
  • Implement enhanced cleaning.

Learn more about these strategies in the CDC's Operational Guidance for K-12 Schools and Early Care and Education Programs to Support In-Person Learning.

Do students, faculty, and staff need to quarantine after close contact with someone with COVID-19?

No. Quarantine is no longer recommended for people who were in close contact to someone with COVID-19 except in certain high-risk congregate settings (such as correctional facilities). However, all close contacts should wear a well-fitting mask or respirator at all times indoors for 10 days after their last exposure. Additionally, close contacts should get tested for COVID-19 at least 5 days after their last exposure.

Masks are not recommended for children under ages 2 years and younger, or for people with some disabilities. In these circumstances, other prevention actions (such as improving ventilation) should be used to avoid transmission for 10 days after exposure.

When should kids wear masks in schools and ECE programs?

DHS recommends everyone ages 2 years and older, regardless of vaccination status, should wear a well-fitting mask in the following situations and settings:

  • In all indoor settings in areas with a high COVID-19 Community Level
  • In health care settings, including school nurses’ offices, regardless of the current COVID-19 Community Level
  • For 10 days after a known or suspected exposure to COVID-19
  • For at least 10 days after developing symptoms or testing positive for COVID-19. People can use a test-based strategy to potentially shorten the duration of mask use.

    Children and staff that are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe illness are encouraged to talk to a doctor about the need to wear a well-fitting mask or respirator at school. Schools with students at risk for getting very sick with COVID-19 must make reasonable modifications when necessary to ensure that all students, including those with disabilities, are able to access in-person learning. Schools might need to require masking in settings such as classrooms or during activities to protect students with immunocompromising conditions or other conditions that increase their risk for getting very sick with COVID-19 in accordance with applicable federal, state, or local laws and policies.

    Students with immunocompromising conditions or other conditions or disabilities that increase risk for getting very sick with COVID-19 should not be placed into separate classrooms or otherwise segregated from other students. For more information and support, visit the U.S. Department of Education’s Disability Rights webpage.

    What is considered a COVID-19 outbreak in a school or ECE program?

    A suspected outbreak of COVID-19 in a school and ECE facility is defined as at least three confirmed or probable cases of COVID-19 who meet the criteria for a facility-associated case, with onset dates or positive test results within 14 days of each other AND no likely known epidemiologic link to a case outside of the school setting.

    A confirmed outbreak of COVID-19 is defined as three or more confirmed or probable cases of COVID-19 identified in the facility who meet the criteria for a facility-associated case, with onset dates or positive test results within 14 days of each other, who were not identified as close contacts of each other in another setting (i.e., household), AND are epidemiologically linked in the facility setting or a school setting-sanctioned extracurricular activity.

    Both suspected and confirmed outbreaks of COVID-19 in schools and ECE facilities must be reported to the local or Tribal health department by law as soon as they are recognized.

    What are the exclusion criteria for schools and ECE programs?

    The following people should be excluded from in-person instruction and activities:

    • People who have symptoms of respiratory or gastrointestinal infections, such as cough, fever, sore throat, vomiting, or diarrhea
    • People who tested positive for COVID-19, with or without having symptoms, and have not yet finished their isolation period per public health recommendations

    Students or staff who come to school or an ECE program with symptoms or develop symptoms while at school or an ECE program should be asked to wear a well-fitting mask or respirator while in the building and be sent home and encouraged to get tested if testing is unavailable at the facility. Symptomatic people who cannot wear a mask should be separated from others as much as possible; children should be supervised by a designated caregiver who is wearing a well-fitting mask or respirator until they leave the facility.

    When should screening testing be used?

    Routine screening testing is no longer recommended. However, schools and ECE programs may consider implementing screening testing in response to an outbreaks. Implementation of screening testing may also be considered for facilities in areas with a high COVID-19 Community Level for:

    • High-risk activities (for example, close contact sports, band, choir, theater)
    • Key times in the year (for example before/after large events such as prom, tournaments, group travel)
    • Returning from breaks (such as, holidays, spring break, at the beginning of the school year).

    Schools and ECE programs serving students who are at risk for getting very sick with COVID-19, such as those with moderate or severe immunocompromise or complex medical conditions, may consider implementing screening testing at a medium or high COVID-19 Community Level.


    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

    Keeping all educators, staff, and students in school buildings safe and healthy is a top priority. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) has provides critical information on policy, practice, and messaging for school districts to use while navigating the many factors necessary to carry out safe in-person learning. In August, 2022, DPI published updated guidance for K-12 schools, titled COVID-19 Infection Control and Mitigation Measures for Wisconsin Schools 2022/2023.


    Find information for early care and education programs

    Preventing and controlling COVID-19 in ECE programs poses unique challenges due to the nature of caring for infants and young children, which necessarily involves close contact between children and their caregivers.

    COVID-19: Early Care and Education Programs

    Last Revised: August 18, 2022

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