COVID-19: Staying Up to Date with Your Vaccines & Boosters

All children 6 months and older can now get a COVID-19 vaccine!

While we work to update our webpages with new information for kids ages 6 months through 4 years old, you can learn more about COVID-19 vaccines for children on the CDC website.

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Being up to date on your COVID-19 vaccines ensures you have the best protection possible against severe illness, hospitalization, and death. Learn what it means to be up to date on your vaccines.

When are you considered up to date?

You are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines when you have received all doses in the primary series and all booster doses recommended for you, when eligible. The recommendations will be different depending on which vaccine you received, your age, your health status, and when you first got vaccinated.

  • Everyone 6 months and older should get all doses in their COVID-19 vaccine primary series. Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are preferred over Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine in most situations.
  • Everyone 5 years and older should get one booster dose to stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines and boost protection against COVID-19. Some individuals should get a second booster dose.

Infographic showing that everyone 12 years and older needs a booster to be up to date with COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine guidance for most people

People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised (for example, due to cancer treatment, HIV infection, medical treatments, or a medical condition like DiGeorge syndrome) have specific COVID-19 vaccine primary series and booster recommendations.

See the guidance for people who are immunocompromised

Children ages 6 months–11 years and under

Pfizer

Note: Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines use different age groups for their children’s vaccines.

Children 6 months–4 years old

You need 3 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 3-8* weeks after your first dose
  3. Third dose given at least 8 weeks after your second dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series AND up to date: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your third dose), since a booster is not currently recommended for children in this age group

Children 5–11 years old

You need 3 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 3-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose)

  3. Booster dose given at least 5 months after your second dose

    Up to date: immediately after one booster dose

Moderna

Note: Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines use different age groups for their children’s vaccines.

Children 6 months–5 years old

You need 2 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 4-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series AND up to date: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose), since a booster is not currently recommended for children in this age group who have received the Moderna primary series

Children 6–11 years old

Wisconsin does not currently have any Moderna vaccine available for children 6-11 years old. We expect to have this vaccine available in mid- or late-July.

You need 2 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 4-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series AND up to date: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose), since a booster is not currently recommended for children in this age group who have received the Moderna primary series

Children and teens ages 12–17 years

Pfizer

You need 3 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 3-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose)

  3. Booster dose given at least 5 months after your second dose

    Up to date: immediately after one booster dose

Moderna

You need 2 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 4-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series AND up to date: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose), since a booster is not currently recommended for children in this age group who have received the Moderna primary series

Adults ages 18–49 years old

Pfizer

You need 3 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 3-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose)

  3. Booster dose given at least 5 months after your second dose

    Up to date: immediately after one booster dose

Moderna

You need 3 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 4-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose)

  3. Booster dose given at least 5 months after your second dose

    Up to date: immediately after one booster dose

Johnson & Johnson

You need 2 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after vaccination

  2. Booster dose given at least 2 months after your first dose

    Up to date: immediately after one booster dose

  3. Optional: If you got a Johnson & Johnson vaccine for both your primary dose and booster dose, you may get a second booster dose of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine at least 4 months after your first booster dose.

In most situations, Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are preferred over Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine for primary and booster vaccination. Johnson & Johnson's vaccine may still be used in some situations.

Adults ages 50 years or older

Pfizer

You need 4 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 3-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose)

  3. First booster dose given at least 5 months after your second dose
  4. Second booster dose given at least 4 months after your first booster

    Up to date: immediately after your second booster

Moderna

You need 4 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose
  2. Second dose given 4-8* weeks after your first dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after the last dose in your primary series (your second dose)

  3. First booster dose given at least 5 months after your second dose
  4. Second booster dose given at least 4 months after your first booster

    Up to date: immediately after your second booster

Johnson & Johnson

You need 3 doses to be up to date.

  1. First dose

    Fully vaccinated with primary series: 2 weeks after vaccination

  2. First booster dose given at least 2 months after your first dose
  3. Second booster dose given at least 4 months after your first booster

    Up to date: immediately after your second booster

*Talk to your healthcare or vaccine provider about the timing of the second dose that is right for you.

  • People ages 6 months through 64 years may consider getting the second dose of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) 8 weeks after the first dose. A longer time between the first and second doses may give you better protection. It might also reduce the already small risk of heart problems like myocarditis. This could be especially beneficial for males ages 12-39 years.
  • The following people should get the second dose 3 weeks after the first Pfizer dose or 4 weeks after the first Moderna dose:
    • People ages 65 years and older
    • People more likely to get very sick from COVID-19
    • Anyone wanting protection sooner (for example, if they are in an area with High COVID-19 Community Levels)

Booster doses

Although COVID-19 vaccines are still very effective in preventing severe disease, recent data suggest their effectiveness at preventing infection or severe illness fades over time, especially in people ages 65 years and older.

Like many vaccines, COVID-19 vaccines need more than one dose to keep you protected against the virus.

These extra doses are known as booster doses because they boost your immune system after your initial protection naturally wears off over time. Several studies showed that getting a booster dose improves your protection against COVID-19 and is very effective at preventing severe disease.

Everyone 5 years and older should get one booster after completing their COVID-19 vaccine primary series.          

Some people can get two boosters:

  • Adults ages 50 years and older
  • People ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised
  • People who got 2 doses (1 primary dose and 1 booster) of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine

You can use CDC’s COVID-19 booster tool to learn if and when you can get boosters to stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines.


An adult pointing to vaccination site

Find a COVID-19 vaccine or booster doses

Visit vaccines.gov, text your zip code to 438829, or call 211 to find vaccine locations near you.
If possible, bring your white CDC COVID-19 vaccination card or a printed or downloaded summary of your immunization record.

 

What you should still do

Your vaccination status—and the status of those around you—can have a big impact on your daily activities. The following guidelines can help you make safe choices during social situations to ensure everyone’s safety.

Do I need to quarantine after close contact with someone with COVID-19? 

You do not need to quarantine if:

Visit our close contacts webpage for more information about next steps after exposure. 


Immunity against COVID-19

Immunity is your body's ability to protect you from getting sick. If you are immune to COVID-19, it means you are less likely to get sick and more likely to stay healthy if you are exposed to the virus. Staying up to date with your vaccines is one of the best ways to build and maintain immunity against COVID-19. 

 

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Last Revised: June 30, 2022

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