COVID-19: Wisconsin Cases

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Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This graph tracks the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Wisconsin over time. Each data point shows the cumulative (total) number of cases confirmed by the date on the bottom of the graph. These numbers include all confirmed cases. A steeper curve signals faster growth in the number of confirmed cases.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

  • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
  • Correction to laboratory result
  • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
  • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
  • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

    Back to a list of charts on this page.


    Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

    This graph presents daily snapshots of new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wisconsin. Hovering over the bars (gray) on the graph above will show you the total number of new cases confirmed on a particular day. The line (dark blue) represents the average number of new confirmed cases over the previous 7-days. This line is presented as a 7-day average to smooth out any day-to-day fluctuations and track overall trends.

    About our data: How do we measure this?

    Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

    Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

    The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

    Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

    • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
    • Correction to laboratory result
    • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
    • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
    • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

    For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

    We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

      Back to a list of charts on this page.


      Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

      These graphs look at confirmed COVID-19 cases by youth age groups, or school-aged children. The top graph shows weekly case counts, while the bottom graph shows cumulative cases over time. Cases can be viewed either “counts” or as “rates.” While counts give the pure number of COVID-19 cases, the rate allows youth age groups to be compared directly while accounting for differences in population size across groups.

      The graph shows cases by date of symptom onset or diagnosis. Symptom onset date is more meaningful than using the date when the case was reported because it represents when illnesses occurred, instead of when the person was tested and the result was reported. In the cumulative figure, a steeper curve indicates a faster growth in cases for a particular age group.

      About our data: How do we measure this?

      Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

      Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

      The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

      Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

      • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
      • Correction to laboratory result
      • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
      • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
      • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

      For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

      We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

        Back to a list of charts on this page.


        Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

        This graph breaks down confirmed cases of COVID-19 by age group, reporting cases by date of symptom onset or diagnosis. This helps us identify age groups that may be experiencing disproportionately high COVID-19 activity as the pandemic continues.

        Symptom onset date is more meaningful than using the date when the case was reported because it represents when illnesses occurred, instead of when the person was tested and the result was reported. In the cumulative figure, a steeper curve indicates a faster growth in cases for a particular age group.

        About our data: How do we measure this?

        Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

        Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

        The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

        Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

        • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
        • Correction to laboratory result
        • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
        • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
        • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

        For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

        We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

          Back to a list of charts on this page.


          Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

          This chart shows us the distribution of all COVID-19 cases in Wisconsin across various categories. It allows you to view case breakdowns by age group, gender, race, ethnicity, and region as well as by case confirmation status. The numbers are shown as a percentage of all cases in Wisconsin. 

          These figures can be used to examine demographic groups that may be experiencing disproportionately high COVID-19 activity as the pandemic continues.

          About our data: How do we measure this?

          What is a COVID-19 probable case?

          A person is counted as a probable case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method* (for example, a PCR or molecular test), but have met one of the following:

          1. Test positive using an antigen test method
          2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19)
          3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate

          A detailed surveillance case definition for COVID-19 probable cases (used by public health and not to be used for making diagnostic or clinical decision) is available under Reporting and Surveillance Guidance on the COVID-19 Health Care Providers webpage.

          *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

          Data source: Except for probable cases, all data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

          Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

          The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

          Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

          • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
          • Correction to laboratory result
          • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
          • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
          • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

          For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

          We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

            Back to a list of charts on this page.


            Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

            This chart breaks down the cases resulting in hospitalization by age group. The displayed percentage represents the proportion of total cases in that age group and not as a proportion of overall cases. The same is true for the graphs showing cases resulting in any intensive care and death.

            About our data: How do we measure this?

            Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

            Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

            The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

            Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

            • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
            • Correction to laboratory result
            • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
            • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
            • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

            For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

            We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

              Back to a list of charts on this page.


              Percent of COVID-19 cases living in group housing

              Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

              This chart shows the percent of confirmed cases in Wisconsin living in group housing. These are shown as a percentage of all confirmed cases in Wisconsin.

              Long-term care facilities include skilled nursing facilities (nursing homes) and assisted living facilities (community-based residential facilities and residential care apartment complexes).

              Other group housing facilities include correctional facilities, homeless shelters, dormitories, and group homes.

              About our data: How do we measure this?

              Long-term care facilities include skilled nursing facilities (nursing homes) and assisted living facilities (community-based residential facilities and residential care apartment complexes).

              Group housing facilities include correctional facilities, homeless shelters, dormitories, and group homes.

              The data on group housing is unknown at this time for a portion of cases because these data have only been systematically collected since April 8, 2020. However, any COVID-19 cases who were part of an outbreak investigation in a long-term care or other group housing facility prior to April 8 are classified under the appropriate group setting category (and are not included in the unknown category).

              Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

              Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

              The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

              Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

              • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
              • Correction to laboratory result
              • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
              • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
              • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

              For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

              We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

                Back to a list of charts on this page.


                Percent of COVID-19 cases by recovery status

                Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

                This chart allows you to view cases broken down by recovery status for every county in Wisconsin. Selecting a county from the dropdown menu will display the recovery status for cases within that county. These numbers are shown as a percentage of confirmed cases in that county.

                About our data: How do we measure this?

                The number of patients recovered from COVID-19 is defined as the number of confirmed cases who are currently alive based on Wisconsin state vital records system data and had one or more of the following:

                • Documentation of resolved symptoms
                • Documentation of release from public health isolation
                • 30 days since symptom onset or diagnosis*

                Active cases include COVID-19 cases who were diagnosed in the last 30 days, are not known to have died, and do not yet meet the definition of having recovered.

                *Our data indicate that the majority of reported cases who recovered did so within 30 days. However, the time to full recovery varies from person to person. In some cases, more than 30 days were required to recover. As a result, a small number of cases who are still recovering might be included in the 'recovered' category.

                Data source: All data are laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 that we extract from our live Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS) and freeze once a day. These numbers are the official state numbers, though counties may report their own totals on different timelines independent of DHS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

                Deaths must be reported by health care providers, medical examiners/coroners, and recorded by local health departments in order to be counted.

                The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative test results reported electronically to DHS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. As a result, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

                Data shown are subject to change. We strive for transparency and accuracy in our data. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may lead to changes to our data, such as positive cases, negative counts, or deaths going up or down, include:

                • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
                • Correction to laboratory result
                • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
                • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
                • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

                For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

                We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

                  Back to a list of charts on this page.


                  How can I download DHS COVID-19 data?

                  All DHS COVID-19 data is available for download directly from the chart on the page. You can click on the chart and then click "Download" at the bottom of the chart (gray bar). 

                  For spatial and mapped data visit one of the following links:

                  Last Revised: September 30, 2020