COVID-19: County Data

Jump to specific COVID-19 chart on this page:

 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This chart is called a cumulative epidemic curve. It shows the total (cumulative) number of confirmed and probable cases by date of symptom onset or diagnosis. Select a county to see how COVID-19 is spreading by county over time. An upward trend in the curve shows a time period where the number of cases are growing. A steeper curve in the chart signals that cases are growing at a higher rate.

Please note that the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance (WEDSS) system underwent routine maintenance and enhancements over the weekend of October 16-18, 2020. Due to this temporary pause in reporting, multiple days of data were uploaded at once, affecting the single day count for the visualizations during that time.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

  1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
  2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
  3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

*This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

  • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
  • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

  • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
  • Correction to laboratory result
  • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
  • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
  • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

Back to a list of charts on this page.


Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This chart is called an epidemic curve (or “epi curve”). It is used to track the number of illnesses over time and see when peaks of illnesses occur. This figure shows data by when someone’s symptoms began, also called symptom onset date. For some data, symptom onset date is missing or the patient did not have symptoms. In that case, the diagnosis date is used. Symptom onset date is more meaningful than using the date when the case was reported because it allows us to more closely track when illnesses occurred.

When using symptom onset date, any downward trends that are seen during the most recent two weeks are usually not true decreases in illness and need to be interpreted with caution. This downward trend usually represents the data lag time; so, data during the most recent two weeks are highlighted as preliminary data. When people have a serious illness, such as COVID-19, it may take several days for them to see a doctor or be tested, it also takes time for the tests to be completed and the results to be sent to public health to be included in case counts.

The figure titled “Cumulative total and newly reported COVID-19 cases by date confirmed” on our COVID-19: Wisconsin Cases webpage does present data by the date a case was reported as being laboratory-confirmed (and not by symptom onset date).

Please note that the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance (WEDSS) system underwent routine maintenance and enhancements over the weekend of October 16-18, 2020. Due to this temporary pause in reporting, multiple days of data were uploaded at once, affecting the single day count for the visualizations during that time.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

  1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
  2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
  3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

*This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

  • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
  • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

  • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
  • Correction to laboratory result
  • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
  • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
  • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

    Back to a list of charts on this page.


    Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

    This chart is called a cumulative mortality curve. It shows the total (cumulative) number of deaths among confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 by date of death. Select a county from the drop-down menu to see the trend in each county. An upward trend in the curve shows a time period where the number of COVID-19-related deaths are increasing. A steeper curve in the chart signals a higher rate of deaths.

    Please note that the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance (WEDSS) system underwent routine maintenance and enhancements over the weekend of October 16-18, 2020. Due to this temporary pause in reporting, multiple days of data were uploaded at once, affecting the single day count for the visualizations during that time.

    About our data: How do we measure this?

    Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

    Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

    Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

    Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

    COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

    Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

    1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
    2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
    3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

    *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

    Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

    • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
    • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

    People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

    Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

    • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
    • Correction to laboratory result
    • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
    • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
    • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

    For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

    We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

      Back to a list of charts on this page.


      Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

      This chart is called a mortality curve. It is used to track the number of deaths over time and see when peaks occur. This chart is showing data by when a person died. Date of death is more meaningful than using the date when the person's death was reported to public health.

      When presenting data by the date of death, any downward trends that are seen during the most recent two weeks are usually not true decreases in deaths and need to be interpreted with caution. This downward trend usually represents the data lag time; thus, data during the most recent two weeks are highlighted as preliminary data. It takes time for patient deaths to be reported to public health and to be included in death counts.

      The figure titled "Cumulative total and newly reported COVID-19 deaths by date reported" on our COVID-19: Wisconsin Deaths webpage does present data by the date a death was reported as being associated with COVID-19 (and not by date of death). 

      Please note that the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance (WEDSS) system underwent routine maintenance and enhancements over the weekend of October 16-18, 2020. Due to this temporary pause in reporting, multiple days of data were uploaded at once, affecting the single day count for the visualizations during that time.

      About our data: How do we measure this?

      Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

      Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

      Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

      Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

      COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

      Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

      1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
      2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
      3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

      *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

      Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

      • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
      • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

      People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

      Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

      • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
      • Correction to laboratory result
      • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
      • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
      • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

      For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

      We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

        Back to a list of charts on this page.


        Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

        This table provides detailed information on the COVID-19 cases and deaths associated with each county in Wisconsin. It also displays the quantity of confirmed cases per 100,000 people, which helps put COVID-19 cases on the same scale for each county for a more apples-to-apples comparison. It also includes the case fatality percentage which records the proportion of confirmed cases who died from COVID-19 by county.

        About our data: How do we measure this?

        Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

        Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

        Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

        Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

        COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

        Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

        1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
        2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
        3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

        *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

        Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

        • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
        • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

        People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

        Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

        • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
        • Correction to laboratory result
        • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
        • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
        • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

        For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

        We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

          Back to a list of charts on this page.


          Number of cases by county and census tract data

          Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

          This map shows the number of COVID-19 cases by county. Darker colors indicate more cases. Clicking on a specific county shows details on the number of confirmed cases and number of people who have had negative confirmatory test results, as well as how many people have died.

          About our data: How do we measure this?

          Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

          Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

          Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

          Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

          COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

          Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

          1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
          2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
          3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

          *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

          Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

          • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
          • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

          People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

          Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

          • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
          • Correction to laboratory result
          • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
          • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
          • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

          For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

          We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

            Back to a list of charts on this page.


            Rate (cases per 100,000 people) of cases by county

            Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

            This map shows the rate of COVID-19 cases by county. Darker colors indicated more cases per 100,000 people. Clicking on a specific county shows details on the number of confirmed cases and number of people who have had negative confirmatory test results, as well as how many people have died. The rates displayed here allow for apples-to-apples comparison across counties because population size is accounted for.

            About our data: How do we measure this?

            Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

            Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

            Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

            Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

            COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

            Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

            1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
            2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
            3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

            *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

            Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

            • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
            • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

            People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

            Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

            • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
            • Correction to laboratory result
            • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
            • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
            • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

            For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

            We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

              Back to a list of charts on this page.


              Number of deaths by county

              Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

              This map displays the number of deaths from COVID-19 in each county. Darker colors indicate more deaths. Clicking on a specific county shows details on the number of confirmed cases and number of people who have had negative confirmatory test results, in addition to how many people have died. It should be noted that population size plays a role in the number of COVID-19 cases in each county, and we only display the actual counts.

              About our data: How do we measure this?

              Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

              Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

              Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

              Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

              COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

              Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

              1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
              2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
              3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

              *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

              Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

              • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
              • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

              People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

              Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

              • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
              • Correction to laboratory result
              • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
              • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
              • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

              For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

              We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

                Back to a list of charts on this page.


                Percentage of cases resulting in death by county

                Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

                This map shows the percent of COVID-19 cases who died from COVID-19 for each county. Darker colors indicate a higher percentage of COVID-19 cases who died. Clicking on a specific county gives a county's specific case fatality percentage. The pop up box also includes more detail on the number of confirmed cases and number of people who have had negative confirmatory test results, as well as how many people have died.

                About our data: How do we measure this?

                Data source: Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS).

                Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information on how cases of COVID-19 are reported to WEDSS.

                Every morning by 9 a.m., we extract the data from WEDSS that will be reported on the DHS website at 2 p.m. These numbers are the official DHS numbers. Counties may report their own case and death counts on their own websites. Because WEDSS is a live system that constantly accepts data, case and death counts on county websites will differ from the DHS counts if the county extracted data from WEDSS at a different time of day. Please consult the county websites to determine what time of day they pull data from WEDSS. Combining the DHS and local totals will result in inaccurate totals.

                Confirmed cases of COVID-19: Unless otherwise specified, the data described here are confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported to WEDSS. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC. Confirmed cases are those that have positive results from diagnostic, confirmatory polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT) that detect genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Illnesses with only positive antigen or positive antibody test results do not meet the definition of confirmed and are not included in the number of confirmed cases.

                COVID-19 Deaths: Unless otherwise specified, COVID-19 deaths reported on the DHS website are deaths among confirmed cases of COVID-19 that meet the vital records criteria set forth by the CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) case definition. Those are deaths that have a death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Deaths associated with COVID-19 must be reported by health care providers or medical examiners/coroners, and recorded in WEDSS by local health departments in order to be counted as a COVID-19 death. Deaths among people with COVID-19 that were the result of non-COVID reasons (e.g., accident, overdose, etc.) are not included as a COVID-19 death. For more information see the FAQ page.

                Probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases. Some visualizations include the option of including information on probable cases of COVID-19 and deaths among probable cases of COVID-19. Cases are classified using the national case definition established by the CDC and the CSTE [https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/.... A person is counted as a probable* case of COVID-19 if they are not positive by a confirmatory laboratory test method (for example, a PCR, or NAT test), but have met one of the following:

                1. Test positive using an antigen test method.
                2. Have symptoms of COVID-19 AND known exposure to COVID-19 (for example, being a close contact of someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19).
                3. COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2 is listed on the death certificate.

                *This definition was updated as of August 19, 2020. Previously, probable cases also included those that had a positive antibody test which detects COVID-19 antibodies in the blood. For more details on this transition, see the CDC’s statement.

                Deaths among probable cases are those that meet one of the following criteria:

                • A probable case of COVID-19 is reported to have died from causes related to COVID-19.
                • A death certificate that lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as an underlying cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death is reported to DHS but WEDSS has no record of confirmatory laboratory evidence for SARS-CoV-2.

                People with negative test results: The number of people with negative test results includes only Wisconsin residents who had negative confirmatory test results (PCR or NAT tests that detect pieces of SARS-CoV-2) reported electronically to WEDSS or entered manually into the WEDSS electronic laboratory module. Because manual entry of negative test results into electronic laboratory module takes more time, this number underestimates the total number of Wisconsin residents with negative test results.

                Data shown are subject to change. For more information see the FAQ page. As individual cases are investigated by public health, there may be corrections to the status and details of cases that result in changes to this information. Some examples of corrections or updates that may result in the case or death counts going up or down, include:

                • Update or correction of case’s address, resulting in a change to their location of residence to another county or state
                • Correction to laboratory result
                • Correction to a case’s status from confirmed to unconfirmed (for example, if they were marked as confirmed because a blood test detecting antibodies was positive instead of a test detecting the virus causing COVID-19)
                • De-duplication or merging and consolidation of case records
                • Update of case’s demographic information from missing or unknown to complete information

                For information on testing, see: COVID-19, testing criteria section.

                We plan to update our data daily by 2 p.m.

                  Back to a list of charts on this page.


                  How can I download DHS COVID-19 data?

                  All DHS COVID-19 data is available for download directly from the chart on the page. You can click on the chart and then click "Download" at the bottom of the chart (gray bar).

                  To download our data visit one of the following links:

                  You can find more instructions on how to download COVID-19 data or access archived spatial data by visiting our FAQ page. The data dictionary(PDF) provides more information about the different elements available in the data above.

                  Last Revised: November 18, 2020