COVID-19: Vaccine Data

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The federal government allocates COVID-19 vaccine to Wisconsin based on population size. Once the vaccine is allocated, Wisconsin places an order with the federal government so they know exactly where to send the vaccine. Orders may not include the entire federal allocation due to limited storage space or to ensure hospitals and clinics are not overwhelmed with more doses than can safely be administered in a week. For the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, doses are shipped first to regional hospitals (called hubs) before going on to locations where they will ultimately be administered. Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is shipped directly to locations that will give vaccine.* Similar to ordering a package online, once vaccine is shipped it can still take several days to reach its final destination. Once the vaccine arrives at a location, they are able to begin vaccinating the populations recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and State Disaster and Medical Advisory Committee (SDMAC) as soon as they are able.

*As part of the federal Pharmacy Partnership Program, DHS is using a portion of Wisconsin’s Moderna vaccine allocation to initiate part A of the program, which provides vaccinations for skilled nursing facility residents and staff. For part B of the program, DHS has reserved additional doses from the state’s Moderna vaccine allocation for long-term care facilities. These doses are directed to vaccinating locations by the federal government and are therefore not reflected in data for shipped doses. These numbers help, in part, to explain the difference between the allocated and shipped data displayed below.

The remaining allocated doses are made available for populations that qualify for vaccination under Phase 1A. To learn more about vaccination data, visit our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) webpage.

We plan to update allocation and shipment data every Tuesday at 2 p.m and administration data Monday through Friday at 2 p.m.

 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

Allocated: This section provides the total number of all COVID-19 vaccine doses made available to Wisconsin by the federal government, including doses allocated for the federal Pharmacy Partnership Program (a subset of the total allocation). This number also includes second dose allocations, now that the interval to receive the second dose has been reached. Doses are allocated based on Wisconsin's population size compared to that of other states, regardless of the state's vaccination phase.

Underneath the total allocation, we have included a specific breakdown of allocations for the federal Pharmacy Partnership Program. The remainder of the total allocation are doses made available by the federal government for the other populations that qualify for vaccination in the current vaccination phase.

Ordered: This section provides the total number of COVID-19 vaccine doses that have been ordered for vaccine providers in Wisconsin from the federal government's allocation for the state. Orders are placed weekly based on the number of vaccine providers in Wisconsin who can schedule and safely administer doses for the week. This does not include doses that have been transferred for the federal Pharmacy Partnership Program. This is a cumulative count of COVID-19 vaccine doses recorded as shipped to Wisconsin providers since December 13, 2020.

In transit: This section reflects the number of COVID-19 vaccine doses vaccine providers in Wisconsin ordered in the previous week. These doses have been shipped by the federal government and are in transit to vaccine locations throughout Wisconsin. These doses will arrive at vaccine locations throughout the week for providers to administer.

Administered: This section provides the total number of COVID-19 vaccine doses that have been given to people in Wisconsin. This includes Wisconsin residents and non-residents who received a COVID-19 vaccine in the state. The line graph shows the change in vaccines administered by day.

Pfizer: This section provides the total number of COVID-19 vaccine doses manufactured by Pfizer that have been administered in Wisconsin.

Moderna: This section provides the total number of COVID-19 vaccine doses manufactured by Moderna that have been administered in Wisconsin.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This chart shows how many COVID-19 vaccine doses were administered each day. We expect to see fewer people vaccinated in the beginning, as supplies of the vaccine will be limited. As more COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, we will see an increase in the number of individuals vaccinated each day.

The orange bars represent the number of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered that were manufactured by Pfizer. The purple bars represent the number of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered that were manufactured by Moderna. In the upper left corner you can select to view data for a specific county or healthcare emergency readiness coalition (HERC) region. Data are shown by where an individual who was vaccinated lives and represent Wisconsin residents who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This includes some residents who have been vaccinated in another state.

Note: Some vaccinations cannot be geocoded to a county or HERC region because the residential information for some patients has not been recorded in WIR. Therefore, the total combined vaccinations in each region will not match the statewide total. These vaccinations are listed as "Unknown" county. As patient information is updated or completed in WIR, the number of vaccinations with unknown location will decrease.

Data shown are subject to change, for more information see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect the total number of vaccines administered per day include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updates or corrections to the manufacturer code reported in WIR
  • Updates or corrections to a patient's information in WIR

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This graph shows the total (cumulative) number of individuals who have completed the COVID-19 vaccine series by day. The Pfizer vaccine series consists of two doses recommended to be administered 21 days apart and the Moderna series consists of two doses recommended to be administered 28 days apart. Completing the COVID-19 vaccine series is important because it provides the best protection against the virus.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This graph represents the number of Wisconsin residents by age group who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine divided by the total estimated population of that group. Population estimates are produced by the DHS Office of Health Informatics for non-Census years. Until COVID-19 vaccines become widely available to the general public, we expect these coverage percentages to be relatively small.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This chart breaks down vaccinations of Wisconsin residents by age group. These data represent the total number of Wisconsin residents in each group who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This graph represents the number of Wisconsin residents by sex who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine divided by the total estimated population of that sex. Population estimates are produced by the DHS Office of Health Informatics for non-Census years. Until COVID-19 vaccines become widely available to the general public, we expect these coverage percentages to be relatively small.

Please note: Demographic data such as biological sex is not required to be reported in WIR. Therefore this data is not available for all individuals who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. As patient information is updated or completed in WIR, we expect to see the number of vaccinations with patient sex unknown to decrease.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

Understanding our data: What does this chart mean?

This chart breaks down vaccinations of Wisconsin residents by sex. These data represent the total number of Wisconsin residents in each group who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Please note: Demographic data such as biological sex is not required to be reported in WIR. Therefore this data is not available for all individuals who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. As patient information is updated or completed in WIR, we expect to see the number of vaccinations with patient sex unknown to decrease.

About our data: How do we measure this?

Data source: The Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR)

Every weeknight at 11:30pm we extract vaccine administration data from WIR that will be reported on the DHS website by 2:00pm the following day. WIR is a live system and providers are constantly sending immunization data. Therefore, data will look different if it is extracted at a different time of day.

Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Information on COVID-19 vaccines can be found on the CDC website.

Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine to the body in order to produce immunity to a specific disease.

Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Vaccine dose: One vaccine dose is one vaccine product (like a shot or a nasal spray). Some vaccines require two or more doses to protect you fully against a disease. Other vaccines give you enough protection to fight the disease after just one dose or shot.

Series completion: Many vaccines require multiple doses spaced out by weeks, months, or years to provide the best protection against a disease. Once someone receives the recommended number of doses within the correct timeframe, their series is considered complete.

A person can complete their Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series if they get their second dose at least 21 days after their first dose.

Vaccine locations: A doctor’s office, pharmacy, local or tribal health department, or other location where people can get their COVID-19 vaccines.

Vaccine record: A list of all vaccines an individual has received along with information about the vaccine, such as name of the vaccine and which provider gave the vaccine.

Vaccination coverage: An estimated percentage of the whole population who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. This helps us understand how well communities are protected from COVID-19. It also helps us see which areas and groups are less protected against COVID-19 so we can take action to help improve vaccination coverage and protect everyone from COVID-19.

Population estimates: The Department of Health Services, Office of Health Informatics, produces mid-year population estimates for counties and the state by age groups, sex, race, and ethnicity for non-Census years. Estimates are used to calculate population-based health statistics such as coverage rates.

Data shown are subject to change. For more information, see the data FAQ. Some examples of corrections or updates that affect an area’s coverage include:

  • Removing duplicates or merging and consolidation of records
  • Updating a patient's address to a different county or state

Back to a list of charts on this page.


 

How can I download DHS COVID-19 data?

All DHS COVID-19 data is available for download directly from the chart on the page. You can click on the chart and then click "Download" at the bottom of the chart (gray bar).

To download our data visit one of the following links:

You can find more instructions on how to download COVID-19 data or access archived spatial data by visiting our FAQ page. The data dictionary (PDF) provides more information about the different elements available in the data above.

Last Revised: January 25, 2021

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