Family, Youth and Community Engagement (FYCE) Measures

FYCE Domains for Engagement (Measures and Indicators)

Family, youth, and community engagement aims to strengthen programming by responding to participants’ experiences. The Maternal Child Health Program (MCH) is committed to supporting successful partnerships and engagement with family, youth, and community members because this is a key strategy to advance health equity. Read on for more information about our domains for engagement.

Family, Youth and Community Partnerships

Colored circles with letters spelling Partnership

  • Respectful, Trusting Relationship Between Staff and the People They Serve
  • Family, Youth, and Community Members Work in a Cooperative Way and Have Shared Goals
  • Commitment to Social Support Systems Within the Program and Larger Community
Things to Try in Your Program
  • Hold an annual meeting in a targeted community with identified family, youth, and community members to brief attendees on your work and provide resources and referrals.
  • Identify and support a community connector or cultural broker to work with you to get your program information into targeted communities and groups of people.
  • Host regular listening sessions in communities to hear from family, youth, and community members about what their concerns are. Document these concerns and consider them while programs are developed and improved.
  • If you have a physical space, host occasional open houses to invite family, youth, and community members in to check out programs in a welcoming and informal atmosphere; invite community connectors to be present.
  • Invite family, youth, and community members to review and comment on proposed programs and written materials; form advisory committee to regularly do this work.
  • Review meeting times, locations, accessibility, transportation, childcare, etc., to ensure that family, youth, and community members can easily participate.

Culture of Inclusion and Equity

Colored circles with letters spelling Culture

Commitment to Health Equity

Things to Try in Your Program
  • Use gender-preferred pronouns to support equity and respect.
  • Acknowledge days of religious, spiritual, and cultural observance when setting meeting schedules or hosting events.
  • Provide opportunities for family, youth, and community members to articulate concerns; create process for submitting anonymous feedback on policies, programs, culture, and/or other work-related issues; and encourage the use of this tool.
  • Rotate who runs meetings; chances are you will end up with different perspectives shared.
  • Engage with a diverse group of stakeholders, providing the necessary support for full inclusion, which may include accessibility and language interpretation.
  • Acknowledge that social and economic differences can offer a variety of strengths and perspectives.

Program Environment

Colored circles with letters spelling Environment

  • Cultural and Language-Based Responsiveness
  • System of Regular Communication with Families, Youth, and Communities
  • Welcoming and Inviting Setting (Physical Space and Online)
Things to Try in Your Program
  • Host a focus group on physical setting, website, or social media: Family, youth, and community members help write focus group questions, lead group discussion, review group feedback, and test recommended changes.
  • Form a review panel of family, youth, and community members who review materials from the program before they are shared with the public.
  • Invite cultural brokers to share information with program staff to improve cultural and linguistic competencies.
  • Create a space that reflects respect for the unique cultures of the people being served, including their comfort and confidentiality.
  • Expand opportunities for direct communication between family, youth, and community members and program staff.

Program Leadership

Colored circles with letters spelling Leadership

  • Family, Youth, and Community Engagement as a Shared Priority
  • Increase Success in Engaging Families, Youth, and Communities
  • Group Decision-Making Happens
  • Support For Developing New Skills
Things to Try in Your Program
  • Edit Mission, Vision, Strategic Plan, and Communications to emphasize value of family, youth, and community engagement.
  • Use a hybrid of top-down and bottom-up leadership style to support authentic engagement.
  • Use the Whole Leadership Framework to establish systems and policies for consistent implementation of family, youth, and community engagement.
  • Dedicate program funds to reimburse family, youth, and community members for sharing their lived experience and for enhancing their leadership skills.

Professional Development

Colored circles with letters spelling Development

  • High-Quality Training for all Staff
  • Career Pathways and Leadership Opportunities
Things to Try in Your Program
  • Invite family, youth, and community members to join program staff to plan and participate in training on equity, diversity, and engagement.
  • Identify individualized training plans to advance program staff members’ understanding of equity and engagement to include how they will integrate concepts into their work.
  • Provide formal recognition of family, youth, and community members of their skills and contributions to the program.
  • Re-evaluate position descriptions and job qualifications to give credit for lived experience. Assess and adjust recruitment plans for positions so they are expanded to reach a broader group of potential applicants.

Continuous Improvement

Colored circles with letters spelling Improvement

Data About Engagement Efforts and Results Drives Decision-Making

Things to Try in Your Program
  • Include family, youth, and community members to help write focus group questions, join group discussion, review group feedback, and help test recommended changes.
  • Have family, youth, and community members help write survey questions, assist with distribution, review feedback, and help test recommended changes.
  • Invite family, youth, and community members to join program staff to discuss using an Impact Matrix to figure out which projects might be easy to implement and have high impact.
  • Hold a Brainwriting session to generate innovative ideas to address a problem with family, youth, and community members.
  • Ask family, youth, and community members to join program staff in a 5 Whys session to get to the root cause of a problem.

Last Revised: October 28, 2020