Environmental Public Health Tracking: Data Details

Two people and a tablet and a desktop computerOn this page you will find data details for the Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking Program's data portal.

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Air Quality

Read frequently asked questions about the air quality data

Ozone

Annual Days Above Standard

This measure is the annual number of days with maximum eight-hour average ozone concentration above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The measure includes both monitored and modeled data. The monitored data comes from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS). When AQS data are available from multiple monitors for a given county and day, the highest eight-hour maximum (daily) ozone concentration among all the monitors is selected for purposes of creating daily county-level data. EPA provides modeled estimates of ozone using Downscaler (DS) model, which uses a statistical approach to fuse monitored data in areas where monitors exist, and relies on Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeled output in areas without monitors. DS modeled estimates are available by census tract centroid; the geographic center of the census tract. Daily county-level modeled estimates are obtained by selecting the maximum value observed among all the census tracts within each county. County-level ozone measures are created using monitor data when available and using modeled estimates for days and locations without such data.

Annual Person-Days Above Standard

This measure is the annual number of person-days with maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The measure includes both monitored and modeled data. The monitored data comes from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS). When AQS data are available from multiple monitors for a given county and day, the highest eight-hour maximum (daily) ozone concentration among all the monitors is selected for purposes of creating daily county-level data. EPA provides modeled estimates of ozone using Downscaler (DS) model, which uses a statistical approach to fuse monitored data in areas where monitors exist, and relies on Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeled output in areas without monitors. DS modeled estimates are available by census tract centroid; the geographic center of the census tract. Daily county-level modeled estimates are obtained by selecting the maximum value observed among all the census tracts within each county. County-level ozone measures are created using monitor data when available and using modeled estimates for days and locations without such data.

Particulate Matter less than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5)

Annual Person-Days Above Standard

This measure is the annual number of person-days with particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) levels above the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The measure includes both monitored and modeled data. The monitored data comes from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS). When AQS data are available from multiple monitors for a given county and day, the highest 24-hour average (daily) PM2.5 concentration among all the monitors is selected for purposes of creating daily county-level data. EPA provides modeled estimates of PM2.5 using Downscaler (DS) model, which uses a statistical approach to fuse monitored data in areas where monitors exist, and relies on Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeled output in areas without monitors. DS modeled estimates are available by census tract centroid; the geographic center of the census tract. Daily county-level modeled estimates are obtained by selecting the maximum value observed among all the census tracts within each county. County-level PM2.5 measures are created using monitor data when available and using modeled estimates for days and locations without such data.

Average Annual Concentration (μ/m3)

This measure is the annual average ambient concentration of particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) in micrograms per cubic meter (based on seasonal averages and daily measurements). The measure includes both monitored and modeled data. The monitored data comes from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS). When AQS data are available from multiple monitors for a given county and day, the highest 24-hour average (daily) PM2.5 concentration among all the monitors is selected for purposes of creating daily county-level data. EPA provides modeled estimates of PM2.5 using Downscaler (DS) model, which uses a statistical approach to fuse monitored data in areas where monitors exist, and relies on Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeled output in areas without monitors. DS modeled estimates are available by census tract centroid the geographic center of the census tract. Daily county-level modeled estimates are obtained by selecting the maximum value observed among all the census tracts within each county. County-level PM2.5 measures are created using monitor data when available and using modeled estimates for days and locations without such data.

Alcohol 

Read frequently asked questions about the alcohol data

Alcohol Outlet Density

Number of Licenses 

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue (DOR) and are based on the liquor licenses issued and reported to the DOR. Data are a point-in-time estimate (that means the data are shared once annually and, at any given time throughout the year, a new license could be issued or an old one not renewed). Data are not suppressed for this measure. This measure represents the number of licenses in a municipality, county, or state in the respective year. Some establishments are issued more than one type of liquor license. The reported number of licenses per geographic region is the number of establishments issued a license. Please note that differences in alcohol outlet density by county or municipality are difficult to interpret. Rural counties may have a higher number of outlets relative to population, but these outlets may be small and serve fewer people than a single outlet in a large city. However, this higher number of outlets relative to the population may also indicate greater accessibility. Moreover, county level data may mask great variations in density for various locations within a given county.  

People per License (PPL)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue (DOR) and are based on the liquor licenses issued and reported to the DOR. Data are a point-in-time estimate (that means th data are shared once annually and, at any given time throughout the year, a new license could be issued or an old one not renewed). Data are not suppressed for this measure. This measure represents the total population in a given geographic area (state, county, and municipality) divided by the number of establishments with liquor licenses. That is, the number of people per alcohol license by municipality, county, or state in the respective year. Please note that differences in alcohol outlet density by county or municipality are difficult to interpret. Rural counties may have a higher number of outlets relative to population, but these outlets may be small and serve fewer people than a single outlet in a large city. However, this higher number of outlets relative to the population may also indicate greater accessibility. Moreover, county level data may mask great variations in density for various locations within a given county. 

Rate of Alcohol Licensure per 500 People

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue (DOR) and are based on the liquor licenses issues and reported to the DOR. Data are a point-in-time estimate (that means the data are shared once annually and, at any given time throughout the year, a new license could be issued or an old one not renewed). Data are not suppressed for this measure. This rate represents the number of establishments with a liquor license divided by the total number of people in the geographic region (municipality, county, or state). This rate is expressed as a number per 500 people in the population.  Please note that differences in alcohol outlet density by county or municipality are difficult to interpret. Rural counties may have a higher number of outlets relative to population, but these outlets may be small and serve fewer people than a single outlet in a large city. However, this higher number of outlets relative to the population may also indicate greater accessibility.  Moreover, rates may mask great variations in density for various locations within a given county.

Number of License Types 

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue (DOR) and are based on the liquor licenses issues and reported to the DOR. Data are a point-in-time estimate (that means the data are shared once annually and, at any given time throughout the year, a new license could be issued or an old one not renewed). Data are not suppressed for this measure. This measure represents the number of alcohol licenses issued by license type by municipality, county, or state in the respective year. Per Wis. Stat. § 125.04(g), type A licenses includes Class "A" retail sale of beer for consumption off the premises (AB); "Class A” retail sale of liquor, including wine, for consumption off the premises (AL); "Class A" retail sale of cider for consumption off the premises (AC); and "Class A” retail sale of beer and liquor, including wine, for consumption off the premises (ALB). Type B includes Class “B” retail sale of beer for consumption on or off the premises (BB); "Class B” retail sale of liquor, including wine, for consumption on the premises and wine in original sealed container for consumption off the premises (BL); and "Class B“ beer and liquor (BLB). Type C is "Class C” wine for consumption only on the premises and carryout of a single opened and resealed bottle if sold with a meal. For more information on what each class permits visit the State of Wisconsin DOR

Alcohol Hospitalizations

Number of Alcohol-Attributable Hospitalizations

These data were collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. When Wisconsin residents were treated in neighboring states, data from those states were obtained (where possible). Hospitalization records for 2001-2004 were obtained from Wisconsin and Iowa. Hospitalizations records for 2005-2014 were obtained from Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota. Data are not suppressed for this measure. To determine which hospitalizations were attributable to alcohol, specifications from the Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Alcohol Program, were used. These specifications define 54 conditions or groups of conditions and associate each with distinct fractions of cases that are attributable to alcohol. These alcohol-attributable fractions (AAF) were determined by the CDC through direct and indirect measurements. The total number of alcohol-attributable hospitalizations was estimated by using the ARDI specified International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) codes and multiplying by the respective alcohol-attributable fraction. 

Crude Rate per 100,000 People

These data were collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. When Wisconsin residents were treated in neighboring states, data from those states were obtained (where possible). Hospitalization records for 2001-2004 were obtained from Wisconsin and Iowa. Hospitalizations records for 2005-2014 were obtained from Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota. Data are not suppressed for this measure. To determine which hospitalizations were attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program, were used. These specifications define 54 conditions or groups of conditions and associate each with distinct fractions of cases that are attributable to alcohol. These alcohol-attributable fractions (AAF) were determined by the CDC through direct and indirect measurements. The total number of alcohol-attributable hospitalizations was estimated by using the ARDI specified ICD-9 codes and multiplying by the respective alcohol-attributable fraction. The crude rate is determined by dividing the total number of alcohol-attributable hospitalizations in the county or state by the respective population. This rate is expressed as a number per 100,000 people.  The crude rate does not take into account the differences across counties in age or sex distribution and are therefore potentially subject to biases from these factors. 

Suicide Deaths

Count

These data were obtained from Wisconsin resident death certificate files. International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes were used to determine suicide deaths. To determine the suicides attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program were used. The ARDI specifications define the fraction of deaths by various means that are attributable to alcohol. Suicide by alcohol of those 15 years of age and older was 100% attributable to alcohol and was identified by ICD-10 code X65.  Suicide and self-inflicted injury deaths not specifically by alcohol of those 15 years of age and older  were considered 23% attributable to alcohol and were identified by the ICD-10 codes X60-X64, X66-X84, and Y87.0.  ARDI determined an AAF of 23% for suicide and self-inflicted injury not specifically by alcohol through direct measurement based on a meta-analysis by Smith et al. (1999). Total suicide deaths attributable to alcohol were determined by multiplying the counts of the ICD-10 codes by the respective AAF and summing. 

Crude Rate per 100,000 People

These data were obtained from Wisconsin resident death certificate files.  International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes were used to determine suicide deaths.  To determine the suicides attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program, were used. The ARDI specifications define the fraction of deaths by various means that are attributable to alcohol. Suicide by alcohol of those 15 years of age and older was 100% attributable to alcohol and was identified by ICD-10 code X65.  Suicide and self-inflicted injury deaths not specifically by alcohol of those 15 years of age and older were considered 23% attributable to alcohol and were identified by the ICD-10 codes X60-X64, X66-X84, and Y87.0.  ARDI determined an AAF of 23% for suicide and self-inflicted injury not specifically by alcohol through direct measurement based on a meta-analysis by Smith et al. (1999). The crude rate was then determined by dividing the total number of alcohol-attributable suicides in the state by the state population. This rate is expressed as a number per 100,000 people.   

Poisoning Deaths

Count

These data were obtained from Wisconsin resident death certificate files.  International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes were used to determine poisoning deaths. Poisoning deaths exclude acute alcohol poisoning and includes only non-ethyl alcohol poisonings. To determine the non-ethyl alcohol poisonings attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program, were used. The ARDI specifications define the fraction of deaths by various means that are attributable to alcohol. Non-ethyl alcohol poisonings of those 15 years of age and older was 29% attributable to alcohol and was identified by ICD-10 codes X40-X44,X46-X49, Y10-Y14, and Y16-Y19.  ARDI determined an AAF of 29% non-ethyl alcohol poisonings through direct measurement based on a meta-analysis by Smith et al. (1999). Total non-ethyl alcohol poisonings deaths attributable to alcohol were determined by multiplying the counts of the ICD-10 codes by the respective AAF and summing. 

Crude Rate per 100,000 People

This data was obtained from Wisconsin resident death certificate files.  International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes were used to determine poisoning deaths. Poisoning deaths exclude acute alcohol poisoning and include only non-ethyl alcohol poisonings. To determine the non-ethyl alcohol poisonings attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program, were used. The ARDI specifications define the fraction of deaths by various means that are attributable to alcohol. Non-ethyl alcohol poisonings of those 15 years of age and older was 29% attributable to alcohol and was identified by ICD-10 codes X40-X44, X46-X49, Y10-Y14, and Y16-Y19.  ARDI determined an AAF of 29% non-ethyl alcohol poisonings through direct measurement based on a meta-analysis by Smith et al. (1999).  The crude rate was then determined by dividing the total number of alcohol-attributable non-ethyl alcohol poisonings in the state by the state population. This rate is expressed as a number per 100,000 people.  

Unintentional Fall Deaths

Count

This data was obtained from Wisconsin resident death certificate files.  International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes were used to determine unintentional fall deaths. To determine the fall deaths attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program, were used. The ARDI specifications define the fraction of deaths by various means that are attributable to alcohol.  Unintentional fall deaths of those 15 years of age and older was 32% attributable to alcohol and was identified by ICD-10 codes W00-W19. ARDI determined an AAF of 32% alcohol-attributable falls through direct measurement based on a meta-analysis by Smith et al. (1999). Total fall deaths attributable to alcohol were determined by multiplying the counts of the ICD-10 codes by the respective AAF and summing.

Crude Rate per 100,000 People

This data was obtained from Wisconsin resident death certificate files.  International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes were used to determine unintentional fall deaths. To determine the fall deaths attributable to alcohol, specifications from Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI), developed by the CDC Alcohol Program, were used. The ARDI specifications define the fraction of deaths by various means that are attributable to alcohol.  Unintentional fall deaths of those 15 years of age and older was 32% attributable to alcohol and was identified by ICD-10 codes W00-W19. ARDI determined an AAF of 32% alcohol-attributable falls through direct measurement based on a meta-analysis by Smith et al. (1999). The crude rate was then determined by dividing the total number of alcohol-attributable falls in the state by the state population. This rate is expressed as a number per 100,000 people.  

Asthma

Read frequently asked questions about the asthma data

Asthma Emergency Department Visits

Number of Emergency Department Visits for Asthma

These data include emergency department visits for asthma and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. Emergency department visits resulting in subsequent hospitalization are also included. Federally-funded hospitals (for example, Veteran's Administration (VA) hospitals, which are exempt from state reporting requirements) are not included in these data. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45 in the principal diagnosis field. Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five visits to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Please note that counts are a statistically-limited way to consider emergency department visits because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more emergency department visits simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates of Emergency Department Visits for Asthma per 10,000 People

These data include emergency department visits for asthma and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. Emergency department visits resulting in subsequent hospitalization are also included. Federally funded hospitals (for example, Veteran's Administration (VA) hospitals, which are exempt from state reporting requirements) are not included in these data. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45 in the principal diagnosis field. Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five visits to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of emergency department visits divided by the total number of people in the area of interest (for example, a county). Population of interest is derived from census data. This is expressed as a number per unit population such as "per 10,000 population." Crude rates do not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Asthma Emergency Department Visits Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 People

These data include emergency department visits for asthma and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. Emergency department visits resulting in subsequent hospitalization are also included. Federally funded hospitals (for example, Veteran's Administration (VA) hospitals, which are exempt from state reporting requirements) are not included in these data. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45 in the principal diagnosis field. Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five visits to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that emergency department visits for asthma may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Asthma Hospitalizations

Number of Hospitalizations for Asthma

These data include hospitalizations for asthma and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45 in the principal diagnosis field. Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five visits to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider emergency department visits because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more hospitalizations simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates of Hospitalizations for Asthma per 10,000 People

These data include hospitalizations for asthma and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45 in the principal diagnosis field. Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five visits to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of hospitalizations divided by the total number of people in the population of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population, such as "per 10,000 population." A crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Asthma Hospitalizations Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 People

These data include hospitalizations for asthma and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45 in the principal diagnosis field. Data are suppresses data for counties with fewer than five visits per 10,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that emergency department visits for asthma may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Average Daily Count

These data include hospitalizations for asthma and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 493 or ICD-10 code of J45. Average Daily Count was calculated by dividing the monthly count by the number of days in that respective month.

Birth Defects

Read frequently asked questions about the birth defects data

Anencephaly

Count

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates.  However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Cleft Lip Without Cleft Palate

Count

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates.  However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Cleft Lip with Cleft Palate

Count

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates.  However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Cleft Palate Without Cleft Lip

Count

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates.  However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Gastroschisis

Count

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates.  However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

Count

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates.  However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Hypospadias

Count 

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods.

 Crude Rate per 10,000 Male Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Limb Deficiencies Combined

Count 

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Tetralogy of Fallot

Count 

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Transposition of the Great Arteries (Vessels)

Count 

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome)

Count 

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. Cases were then summed over five year periods. 

Crude Rate per 10,000 Live Births

Data came from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NDPN). NDPN collects data from a combination of birth certificates, hospital discharge data and fetal death records. This is a five year crude rate. Rates were calculated by dividing the count by the number of live births in Wisconsin in those years and multiplied by 10,000. Rates were suppressed if the count was three or less over a five year time period to avoid unstable rates. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed.

Cancer

Read frequently asked questions about the cancer data

Bladder Cancer

Number of New Bladder Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new bladder cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Bladder Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of bladder cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Cancer of the Brain and Central Nervous System

Number of New Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer: Ages 0-14

Counts of new brain and central nervous system cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-14

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of cancer of the brain and central nervous system reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of New Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer: Ages 0-19

Counts of new brain and central nervous system cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-19

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of cancer of the brain and central nervous system reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of New Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer: All Ages

Counts of new brain and central nervous system cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of cancer of the brain and central nervous system reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Cancer of the Esophagus

Number of New Esophagus Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new esophagus cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Esophagus Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of esophagus cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Female Breast Cancer

Number of New Female Breast Cancer Cases: Ages 0-49

Counts of new female breast cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Female Breast Cancer per 100,000 People: Ages 0-49

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of female breast cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of New Female Breast Cancer Cases: Ages 50+

Counts of new female breast cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Female Breast Cancer per 100,000 People: Ages 50+

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of female breast cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer

Number of New Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new kidney and renal pelvis cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Kidney and Renal Pelvis Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of kidney renal and pelvis cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Cancer of the Larynx

Number of New Larynx Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new larynx cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Larynx Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of larynx cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Leukemia

Number of Leukemia: Ages 0-14

Counts of new leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Leukemia per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-14

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of Leukemia: Ages 0-19

Counts of new leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Leukemia per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-19

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of Leukemia: All Ages

Counts of new leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Leukemia per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

Number of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: Ages 0-14

Counts of new acute lymphocytic leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-14

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of acute lymphocytic leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: Ages 0-19

Counts of new acute lymphocytic leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-19

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of acute lymphocytic leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: All Ages

Counts of new acute lymphocytic leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of acute lymphocytic leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Number of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Ages 0-14

Counts of new acute myeloid leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Acute Myeloid Leukemia per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-14

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of acute myeloid leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Ages 0-19

Counts of new acute myeloid leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Acute Myeloid Leukemia per 1,000,000 People: Ages 0-19

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of acute myeloid leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Number of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: All Ages

Counts of new acute myeloid leukemia cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates of Acute Myeloid Leukemia per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of acute myeloid leukemia reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Liver Cancer

Number of New Liver Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new liver cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Liver Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of liver cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Number of New Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Cases: All Ages

Counts of new non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Melanoma

Number of New Melanoma Cases: All Ages

Counts of new melanoma cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Melanoma per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of melanoma reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Mesothelioma

Number of New Mesothelioma Cases: All Ages

Counts of new mesothelioma cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Mesothelioma per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of mesothelioma reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Cancer of the Oral Cavity and Pharynx

Number of New Oral Cavity and Pharynx Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new oral cavity and pharynx cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Oral Cavity and Pharynx Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of oral cavity and pharynx cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Cancer of the Pancreas

Number of Pancreatic Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new pancreatic cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Pancreatic Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of pancreatic cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Thyroid Cancer

Number of Thyroid Cancer Cases: All Ages

Counts of new thyroid cancer cases are reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin for a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed.

Age-adjusted Incidence Rates of Thyroid Cancer per 100,000 People: All Ages

Incidence rates are calculated from the annual number of new cases (counts) of thyroid cancer reported to the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System by health care providers in Wisconsin during a given year. Data for counties with fewer than six cases are suppressed to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Read frequently asked questions about the carbon monoxide poisoning data

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Emergency Department Visits

Number of Emergency Department Visits for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning (Counts)

These data include emergency department visits for carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 986, E868.2, E868.3, E868.8, E868.9, E982.0, or E982.1 or an ICD-10 code of T58.01, T58.04, T58.11, T58.14, T58.2X1, T58.2X4, T58.8X1, T58.8X4, T58.91 or T58.94 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Records of intentional or purposeful CO poisoning are excluded. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are not suppressed for this measure. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider emergency department visits because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more emergency department visits simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include emergency department visits for carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 986, E868.2, E868.3, E868.8, E868.9, E982.0, or E982.1 or an ICD-10 code of T58.01, T58.04, T58.11, T58.14, T58.2X1, T58.2X4, T58.8X1, T58.8X4, T58.91 or T58.94 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Records of intentional or purposeful CO poisoning are excluded. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of emergency department visits divided by the total number of people in the area of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population, such as "per 100,000 population." The crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-adjusted Rates per 100,000

These data include emergency department visits for carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 986, E868.2, E868.3, E868.8, E868.9, E982.0, or E982.1 or an ICD-10 code of T58.01, T58.04, T58.11, T58.14, T58.2X1, T58.2X4, T58.8X1, T58.8X4, T58.91 or T58.94 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Records of intentional or purposeful CO poisoning are excluded. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that emergency department visits for carbon monoxide may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hospitalizations

Number of Hospitalizations for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning (Counts)

These data include hospitalizations for carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 986, E868.2, E868.3, E868.8, E868.9, E982.0, or E982.1 or an ICD-10 code of T58.01, T58.04, T58.11, T58.14, T58.2X1, T58.2X4, T58.8X1, T58.8X4, T58.91 or T58.94 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Records of intentional or purposeful CO poisoning are excluded.  These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are not suppressed for this measure. Please note that counts are a statistically-limited way to consider hospitalizations because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more hospitalizations simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include hospitalizations for carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 986, E868.2, E868.3, E868.8, E868.9, E982.0, or E982.1 or an ICD-10 code of T58.01, T58.04, T58.11, T58.14, T58.2X1, T58.2X4, T58.8X1, T58.8X4, T58.91 or T58.94 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Records of intentional or purposeful CO poisoning are excluded.. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of hospitalizations divided by the total number of people in the population of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population such as "per 10,000 population." A crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-adjusted Rates per 100,000

These data include hospitalizations for carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 986, E868.2, E868.3, E868.8, E868.9, E982.0, or E982.1 or an ICD-10 code of T58.01, T58.04, T58.11, T58.14, T58.2X1, T58.2X4, T58.8X1, T58.8X4, T58.91 or T58.94 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Records of intentional or purposeful CO poisoning are excluded. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that hospitalizations for asthma may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Mortality

Number of Deaths from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning (Counts)

These data include deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from the National Vital Statistics System from the National Center for Health Statistics. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed for counties with nine or fewer (including zero) per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider deaths because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from the National Vital Statistics System from the National Center for Health Statistics. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed for counties with nine or fewer (including zero) per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. The crude rate is the number of deaths divided by the total number of people in the population of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population, such as "per 10,000 population." A crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-adjusted Rates per 100,000

These data include deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning and are collected from the National Vital Statistics System from the National Center for Health Statistics. These data include three categories of carbon monoxide poisoning causes:

  1. Unintentional, non-fire related;
  2. Unintentional, fire-related; and
  3. Unknown intent.

Data are suppressed for counties with nine or fewer (including zero) per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that carbon monoxide poisoning deaths may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Heart Attack

Read frequently asked questions about the heart attack data

Heart Attack Hospitalizations

Number of Hospitalizations for Heart Attack among Persons 35 and over

These data include hospitalizations for heart attack and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 410.0-410.92 or an ICD-10 code of I21.0-I22.9 in the principal diagnosis field. Starting in 2015, transfers between hospitals were excluded.  Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than six hospitalizations to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider hospitalization data because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more hospitalizations simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates of Hospitalizations for Heart Attack among Persons 35 and over per 10,000 People

These data include hospitalizations for heart attack and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 410.0-410.92 or an ICD-10 code of I21.0-I22.9 in the principal diagnosis field. Starting in 2015, transfers between hospitals were excluded.  Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than six hospitalizations to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of hospitalizations divided by the total number of people in the area of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population, such as "per 10,000 population." A crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-adjusted Rates of Hospitalization for Heart Attack among Persons 35 and over per 10,000 People

These data include hospitalizations for heart attack and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes hospitalizations with an ICD-9 code of 410.0-410.92 or an ICD-10 code of I21.0-I22.9 in the principal diagnosis field. Starting in 2015, transfers between hospitals were excluded.  Data are suppressed for counties with fewer than six hospitalizations to protect confidentiality and improve rate stability. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that heart attacks are more frequent among older individuals and some counties have more older individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Heat

Read frequently asked questions about the heat stress data

Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits

Number of Emergency Department Visits for Heat Stress (Counts)

These data include emergency department visits for heat stress and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9) or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are not suppressed for this measure. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider emergency department visits because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more emergency department visits simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include emergency department visits for heat stress and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. The age-specific rate is the number of emergency department visits divided by the total number of people in that age category (for example, among people aged 65+). This is expressed as a number per unit population such as "per 100,000 population." The age-specific rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-specific Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include emergency department visits for heat stress and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded.. Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. The age-specific rate is the number of emergency department visits divided by the total number of people in that age category (for example, among people aged 65+). This is expressed as a number per unit population such as "per 100,000 population." The age-specific rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-adjusted Rates per 100,000

These data include emergency department visits for heat stress and are collected from emergency room visit discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that emergency department visits for heat stress may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Heat Stress Hospitalizations

Number of Hospitalizations for Heat Stress (Count)

These data include hospitalizations for heat stress and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are not suppressed for this measure. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider hospitalizations because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more hospitalizations simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include hospitalizations for heat stress and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of hospitalizations divided by the total number of people in the area of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population, such as "per 100,000 population." The crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-specific Crude Rates per 100,000

These data include hospitalizations for heat stress and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. The age-specific rate is the number of hospitalizations divided by the total number of people in that age category (for example, among people aged 65+). This is expressed as a number per unit population, such as "per 100,000 population." The age-specific rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. Use age-adjusted rates for a better standardized measure.

Age-adjusted Rates per 100,000

These data include hospitalizations for heat stress and are collected from inpatient hospital discharge records. This measure includes emergency department visits with an ICD-9 code of 992.0-992.9, E900.0, or E900.9 or an ICD-10 code of T67.0-T67.9, X30, or X32 in the principal or other diagnosis fields. Emergency department visits due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (ICD-9 code E900.1 or ICD-10 code W92) are excluded. Data are suppressed when there are fewer than five visits to improve rate stability. However, rates with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that hospitalizations for heat stress may be more frequent among younger individuals and some counties have more younger individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Heat Vulnerability (Sensitivity)

Age-adjusted Rates per 10,000 of Heart Attack Hospitalization Among Persons 35+

The heart attack data are collected from inpatient hospital records. This measure includes cases with an ICD-9 code of 410.0-410.92 or an ICD-10 code of I21.0-I22.9 in the principal diagnosis field. Starting in 2015, transfers between hospitals were excluded. The National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppresses data for counties with fewer than five hospitalizations per 10,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. An age-adjusted rate is a rate that is statistically modified to eliminate the potential biasing effect of different age distributions across different populations. In other words, the age-adjusted rate accounts for the possibility that heart attacks are more frequent among older individuals and some counties have more older individuals than others. Direct age-adjustment is conducted using the 2000 US standard population.

Median Household Income

Median household income data are collected from the U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates.

Number of People in Poverty

These data are collected from the U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Income and Poverty estimates. Read more about the Census's methodology on their website.

Percent of People in Poverty

These data are collected from the U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Income and Poverty estimates. Read more about the Census's methodology on their website.

Number of People Without Health Insurance

These data are collected from the U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Health Insurance Estimates. Data were downloaded for 2005 and 2006, 13 fields were extracted, and the 2005 and 2006 data were concatenated. Read more about the Census's methodology on their website.

Percent of People Without Health Insurance

These data are collected from the U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Health Insurance Estimates. Data were downloaded for 2005 and 2006, 13 fields were extracted, and the 2005 and 2006 data were concatenated. Read more about the Census's methodology on their website.

Heat-related Mortality

Number of Heat-related Deaths (Counts)

These data include deaths from heat-related deaths and are collected from the Wisconsin State Vital Records Office, Office of Health Informatics. These data include deaths in which excessive heat exposure (ICD-10 code X30) is reported as either the underlying or a contributing cause of death. Deaths due to exposure to excessive heat of man-made origin (W92) are excluded. Only deaths that occurred in the summer months (May through September) are included in this measure. Data are not suppressed for this measure. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider deaths because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Historical Climate

Historical Extreme Heat Days (Heat Index)

Absolute Threshold (Counts)

These data are collected from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), available at the 1/8th degree grid (approximately 14x14 km). Grid-level data were converted into county-level estimates by processing modeled data. The measure involves calculation of a daily maximum heat index, which takes into account relative humidity and temperature. The measure uses a threshold of 90 degrees Fahrenheit to constitute an extreme heat day.

Historical Extreme Heat Days (Maximum Temperature)

Absolute Threshold (Counts)

These data are collected from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), available at the 1/8th degree grid (approximately 14x14 km). Grid-level data were converted into county-level estimates by processing modeled data. The measure represents daily maximum temperature using a threshold of 90 degrees Fahrenheit to constitute an extreme heat day.

Immunizations

Read frequently asked questions for the immunizations data

Percent Immunized by Vaccine

The data source is the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR). The WIR is a confidential database that collects immunization histories for Wisconsin residents. WIR collects the date and type of each vaccine a person receives. WIR receives data from local health departments, public and private health care providers, health maintenance organizations, pharmacies, tribal health centers/clinics, and schools. Reporting to WIR is voluntary except for pharmacists and pharmacies who vaccinate children and for Vaccines for Children (VFC) providers. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of immunized individuals (numerator) by the population in the selected age group and geographic area (denominator). For the non-influenza vaccines, the population (i.e., denominator) is obtained from the WIR and is equal to the total number of individuals with a WIR client record for the selected age group and geographic area. For influenza vaccine, the numerators were obtained from the WIR and the denominators were obtained from population estimates from the Wisconsin Interactive Statistics on Health (WISH).

Note: All measures are based on the routine vaccination recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The details below describe the measures on the Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking Portal and should not be used as descriptions of the ACIP vaccination recommendations. For example, measuring the percentage of children who have received recommended vaccines by age 24 months is a common benchmark for evaluating the vaccination status of young children, but does not reflect or evaluate the exact ages at which each vaccine dose is recommended. For descriptions and details of the ACIP vaccination recommendations see the Child Vaccine Schedule and the Adult Vaccine Schedule.

4:3:1:3:3:1:4 - Series of 7 Vaccines

The 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 vaccination series is a series of seven vaccines recommended for children and includes: four or more doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, three or more doses of polio vaccine, one or more doses of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, three or more doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, three or more doses of hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine, one or more doses of varicella vaccine, and four or more doses of Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned 24 months and completed this vaccine series by the total number of children who turned age 24 months (by year and geographic area). Thus, the 2016 data include information on children born during 2014. (Note: Children who completed the series of seven vaccines are also found in the counts of the individual vaccine measures. For example, a child who completed the series of seven vaccines will also be counted as having completed DTaP, Polio, MMR, Hib, HepB, Varicella, and PCV vaccine measures. However, a child who received three doses of the polio vaccine and no other vaccines will be included in the Polio vaccine measure (below) but not in 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 series measure.)

DTaP Vaccine (4+ doses)

Diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis (DTaP) vaccine provides protection from the diseases diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. DTaP is for use in children. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received four doses of DTaP vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and had received four or more doses of DTaP by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area

Hepatitis B Vaccine (3+ doses)

Hepatitis B vaccine provides protection from hepatitis B. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and had received three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area.

Hib Vaccine (3+ doses)

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine protects against disease caused by Hib infection. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received three or four doses of Hib vaccine, depending on the Hib vaccine brand received. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and had received three or more doses of Hib vaccine by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area.

HPV Vaccine (1+ doses)

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine protects against disease caused by HPV, including HPV-related cancers. Before 2017, three doses of HPV vaccine were recommended to be considered completely vaccinated for HPV. To assess the initiation of HPV vaccination, this measure assesses the percent of individuals who received one or more doses of HPV vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 13-18 years and had received one or more doses of HPV vaccine by the total number of same-aged adolescents in that year and geographic area.

HPV Vaccine (3+ doses)

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine protects against disease caused by HPV, including HPV-related cancers. Before 2017, three doses of HPV vaccine were recommended to be considered completely vaccinated for HPV. To assess the completion of HPV vaccination, this measure assesses the percent of individuals who received three or more doses of HPV vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 13-18 years or 19-26 years and had received three or more doses of HPV vaccine by the total number of same-aged adolescents in that year and geographic area.

Influenza Vaccine (1+ doses)

Influenza vaccine protects against influenza disease, commonly called the flu. Every influenza season (approximately August through June) all individuals age 6 months and older are recommended to receive influenza vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of people who received one or more doses of influenza vaccine during the selected influenza season by the total number of same-aged people in the selected season, year, and geographic region. (For instance, the 2016-2017 influenza season includes information on influenza doses received during August 1, 2016 through June 20, 2017).

MenACWY (Meningitis) Vaccine (1+ doses)

Meningococcal conjugate vaccine ACWY (MenACWY) protects against disease caused by bacteria Neisseria meningitides serogroups A, C, W, and Y. Adolescents are recommended to receive MenACWY vaccine at age 11-12 and a booster dose at age 16 years. However, if the first dose is received at age 16 or older, no booster dose is needed. To assess the initiation of MenACWY vaccination, this measure assesses the percent of individuals who received one or more doses of the MenACWY vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of individuals aged 13-18 years who received 1 or more doses of the MenACWY vaccine by the total number of same-aged individuals in the selected year and geographic area.

MenACWY (Meningitis) Vaccine (up-to-date)

Meningococcal conjugate vaccine ACWY (MenACWY) protects against disease caused by bacteria Neisseria meningitides serogroups A, C, W, and Y. Adolescents are recommended to receive MenACWY vaccine at age 11-12 and a booster dose at age 16 years. However, if the first dose is received at age 16 or older, no booster dose is needed. To assess the completion of MenACWY vaccination, this measure assesses the number of individuals who were up-to-date (had received a booster dose or a first dose at age 16 years or older) with MenACWY vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of individuals aged 17-18 years who were up-to-date with the MenACWY vaccine by the total number of same-aged individuals in the selected year and geographic area.

MMR Vaccine (1+ doses)

Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine protects against the diseases measles, mumps, and rubella. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received one dose of MMR vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and had received one or more doses of MMR vaccine by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area.

PCV Vaccine (4+ doses)

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) protects against diseases caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. Before 2010, the only PCV vaccine that was available was PCV7, which protects against 7 serotypes of S. pneumoniae. In 2010, PCV13 vaccine was introduced and protects against 13 serotypes S. pneumoniae. Children assessed during the earliest years displayed for this measure might have received either PCV7 or PCV13 or both. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received 4 doses of PCV vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and had received 4 or more doses of PCV vaccine by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area

PCV13 Vaccine (1+ doses)

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) protects against disease caused by 13 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae. One dose of PCV13 vaccine is recommended for all adults aged 65 years and older. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of adults who received one or more doses of the PCV13 vaccine on or after their 65th birthday by the total number of same-aged adults in that year and geographic area.

PPSV23 Vaccine (1+ doses)

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) protects against disease caused by 23 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. One dose of PPSV23 vaccine is routinely recommended for adults age 65 and older. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of adults who received one or more doses of the PPSV23 vaccine on or after their 65th birthday by the total number of same-aged adults in that year and geographic area.

Polio Vaccine (3+ doses)

Polio vaccine protects against polio. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received 3 doses of polio vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and had received three or more doses of polio vaccine by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area.

Tdap vaccine (1+ doses)

Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular-pertussis (Tdap) vaccine provides protection from the diseases diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Tdap is for use in adolescents and adults: one dose is recommended during a lifetime (except for pregnant women who are recommended to receive Tdap during every pregnancy). Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of individuals who turned age 13-18 years or age 19-64 years who had received one or more doses of Tdap by the total number of same-aged individuals in that year and geographic area.

Varicella Vaccine (1+ doses)

Varicella vaccine protects against chickenpox disease. By age 24 months, children are recommended to have received one dose of varicella vaccine. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of children who turned age 24 months and who received one or more doses of varicella vaccine by the total number of same-aged children in that year and geographic area.

Zoster Vaccine (1+ doses)

Zoster vaccine protects against herpes zoster (shingles) disease. One dose of zoster vaccine is recommended for adults aged 60 years and older. Percent immunized is calculated by dividing the number of adults aged 60 years or older who received one or more doses of zoster vaccine by the total number of same-aged adults in that year and geographic area

Lead Poisoning

Read frequently asked questions about the childhood lead poisoning data

Childhood Lead Poisoning

Number of Children Tested Positive for Childhood Lead Poisoning

Wisconsin blood lead testing data from children less than six years of age are reported to the Wisconsin Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. Lead poisoning is defined as a child with a capillary or venous blood lead level (BLL) greater than or equal to 5 micrograms per deciliter (μg/dL). Data are de-duplicated within a given year such that they contain the most recent confirmatory (venous) test following an elevated screening (capillary) test. If no confirmatory test for the individual is available, the most recent screening test result is used. If a child had five tests in 2005, for example, only one test would be counted and reflected in the portal data. However, a child could appear in multiple time periods.  For example, if I child was tested in 2005 at age three, the child could be retested in 2006 at age four. Both tests would be counted and reflected in the portal.  The code "NPT" is used to indicate a poisoning case where the child was not previously tested and "PT" is used to indicate poisoning cases where the child was previously tested. The number of children poisoned is a count value and is not the best manner to use for comparisons between counties or regions such as census tract. Some areas of the state will have higher numbers of poisonings simply because there are more people there. The percent of children poisoned is a better measure for comparison between geographic areas. To protect confidentiality, data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five children tested. The Census tract refers to the child’s home address, not the place where the child was tested. 

Number of Children Tested for Childhood Lead Poisoning

Wisconsin blood lead testing data from children less than six years of age are reported to the Wisconsin Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. This measure is a count of all children tested. Children may be tested using a capillary or venous BLL with preference given to the latter when available. Children who received multiple tests are only counted once per year. To protect confidentiality, data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five children tested.

Percent of Children with Childhood Lead Poisoning (Among Those Tested)

Wisconsin blood lead testing data from children less than six years of age are reported to the Wisconsin Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. Lead poisoning is defined as a child with a capillary or venous BLL greater than or equal to 5 micrograms per deciliter (μg/dL). Data are de-duplicated such that they contain the most recent confirmatory (venous) test following an elevated screening (capillary) test. If no confirmatory test for the individual is available, the most recent screening test result is used. The code "NPT" is used to indicate a poisoning case where the child was not previously tested and "PT" is used to indicate poisoning cases where the child was previously tested. The percent of children poisoned is calculated as the number of children poisoned divided by the number of children tested. This measure is the most accurate one to use for comparisons between geographic areas of the state as it accounts, to a large degree, for differences in population size between regions. To protect confidentiality, data are suppressed for counties with fewer than five children tested (that is, with a denominator of <5).

Lyme Disease

Read frequently asked questions about the Lyme disease data

Cases

Total Count of Lyme Disease Cases

These data are obtained from the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS). WEDSS is a secure, web-based system used by public health staff, infection control practitioners, clinical laboratories, clinics, and other disease reporters to report communicable diseases. "Month" indicates the month of illness onset. County-level data are based on the county of residence of the case; some infections may have been acquired during travel to other areas. The entire state of Wisconsin is considered to be endemic for Lyme disease; thus, any Wisconsin resident is considered to be "exposed." "Confirmed cases" of Lyme disease include:

  1. Those with an erythema migrans (EM) rash that is greater or equal to 5 cm in diameter and diagnosed by a medical professional OR 
  2. Those with at least one non-EM confirmatory sign or symptom indicating late manifestation of disease (arthritis, Bell's palsy or other cranial neuritis, encephalomyelitis, lymphocytic meningitis, radiculoneuropathy, or 2nd or 3rd degree atrioventricular block) that also has laboratory evidence of infection that meets criteria.

Non-confirmatory signs and symptoms include fever, sweats, chills, fatigue, neck pain, arthalgias, myalgias, fibromyalgia syndromes, cognitive impairment, headache, paresthesias, visual/auditory impairment, peripheral neuropathy, encephalopathy, palpitations, bradycardia, bundle branch block, myocarditis, or other rash. In 2008, the national surveillance case definition for Lyme disease introduced probable cases. Probable cases are any other physician-diagnosed Lyme disease cases with laboratory evidence of infection and non-confirmatory signs and symptoms. In 2012, to address the increased burden of Lyme disease reporting on local health departments and medical care providers, criteria in Wisconsin for reporting Lyme disease were revised so that only cases with an EM rash required public health follow up. Public health follow up involves a complete case investigation to collect information on other clinical signs and symptoms, possible exposures, and treatment. As an alternative to follow-up for every suspect Lyme disease case, a statistical method was implemented to estimate statewide cases based on the number of total laboratory reports for each year since 2012. The total state case count measure since 2012 is the sum of confirmed, probable, and estimated cases. However, the total state case count before 2012 and all total county case counts do not include estimated cases.  For the total state case count, the data include only confirmed cases from 1991-2007; confirmed and probable cases from 2008-2011; and confirmed, probable, and estimated cases from 2012 to present. 
 

Incidence

Crude Rates of Confirmed Cases per 100,000 Population

These data are obtained from the Wisconsin Electronic Disease Surveillance System (WEDSS). WEDSS is a secure, web-based system used by public health staff, infection control practitioners, clinical laboratories, clinics, and other disease reporters to report communicable diseases. County-level data are based on the county of residence of the case; some infections may have been acquired during travel to other areas. The national surveillance case definition was revised in 2008 to include probable cases. In years prior to 2008, the incidence rate was calculated using confirmed cases as the numerator. Incidence rates after 2008 were calculated using confirmed and probable cases as the numerator. The incidence, or crude rate, is then calculated by dividing the numerator by the total number of people in the population of interest (for example, a county). Population estimates are derived from the US Census. This is expressed as a number per unit population such as "per 100,000 population." Note: a crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and are therefore subject to bias. For example, as Lyme disease is less common among working age individuals, areas of the state with more working age individuals could appear, artificially, to have fewer cases generally. For more information on age-adjustment and biases see our glossary of terms.

Oral Health

Read frequently asked questions about the oral health data

Emergency Department Visits (Non-Traumatic)

Counts

These data are collected from emergency room visit records. Patient visits with an ICD-9 code of a primary dental diagnosis that was considered preventable and non-traumatic are collected for this measure. This measure includes cases with an ICD-9 code of 520.6, 521.00-521.09, 521.9, 522.0, 522.1, 522.4-522.7, 522.9, 523.0, 523.1, 523.3-523.6, 523.9, 525.9, 528.3, and 528.9. Patients with the diagnosis of disturbances in tooth eruption (ICD-9-CM code 520.6) were only included if they fell in the 15 to 30 year age range. This permitted those that may seek emergency care due to impacted third molars to be included. Patients who concomitantly had an ICD-9 code in the 800 to 900 range or an E-code associated with their dental diagnosis were excluded. An E-code and ICD-9 code in the 800 to 900 range denotes that the patient's diagnosis was associated with an unintentional or intentional injury or poisoning, and since the target population should include only those with non-traumatic dental diagnoses, this group was excluded. Data for counties with fewer than ten visits are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. Please note that counts are a statistically-limited way to consider emergency department visits because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more emergency department visits simply because they have more people. An age-adjusted rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Crude Rate (per 10,000 population)

These data are collected from emergency room visit records. Patient visits with an ICD-9 code of a primary dental diagnosis that was considered preventable and non-traumatic are collected for this measure. This measure includes cases with an ICD-9 code of 520.6, 521.00-521.09, 521.9, 522.0, 522.1, 522.4-522.7, 522.9, 523.0, 523.1, 523.3-523.6, 523.9, 525.9, 528.3, and 528.9. Patients with the diagnosis of disturbances in tooth eruption (ICD-9-CM code 520.6) were only included if they fell in the 15 to 30 year age range. This permitted those that may seek emergency care due to impacted third molars to be included. Patients who concomitantly had an ICD-9 code in the 800 to 900 range or an E-code associated with their dental diagnosis were excluded. An E-code and ICD-9 code in the 800 to 900 range denotes that the patient's diagnosis was associated with an unintentional or intentional injury or poisoning, and since the target population should include only those with non-traumatic dental diagnoses, this group was excluded. Data for counties with fewer than ten visits per 10,000 are suppressed to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases are not suppressed. The crude rate is the number of emergency department visits divided by the total number of people in the area of interest (for example, a county). This is expressed as a number per unit population such as "per 10,000 population." The crude rate does not take into account the differences in age distributions across counties and is therefore subject to bias.

Population on Fluoridated Public Water System

Percent of Population

These data are collected from the Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS). Data are based on samples taken from active public water systems and do not reflect data from private wells. The data represent the percent of the population on public drinking water that have access to fluoridated water, regardless of whether it is at the recommended level.

Third Grade Survey

Percent of Children who Experience Caries

These data are from the "Healthy Smiles, Healthy Growth" statewide survey administered by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Data are collected during the school year (e.g., 2000-01). The survey included a representative sample of third grade students in Wisconsin public schools. The caries experienced measure captures children with either treated decay, untreated decay, or both.

Percent of Children who Need Treatment

These data are from the "Healthy Smiles, Healthy Growth" statewide survey administered by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Data are collected during the school year (e.g., 2000-01). The survey included a representative sample of third grade students in Wisconsin public schools. The need treatment measure captures children that exhibited a dental condition that needed to be addressed by a dentist.

Percent of Children with Sealants

These data are from the "Healthy Smiles, Healthy Growth" statewide survey administered by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Data are collected during the school year (e.g., 2000-01). The survey included a representative sample of third grade students in Wisconsin public schools. The sealants measure captures children with the presence of at least one sealant on a permanent molar tooth.

Percent of Children with Untreated Decay

These data are from the "Healthy Smiles, Healthy Growth" statewide survey administered by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Data are collected during the school year (e.g., 2000-01). The survey included a representative sample of third grade students in Wisconsin public schools. The untreated decay measure captures children with the presence of a dental cavity where the breakdown of the enamel surface is readily observed.

Reproductive Outcomes

Read frequently asked questions about the reproductive outcomes data

Fertility

Total Fertility Rate per 1,000 Women of Reproductive Age

These data are collected from birth certificates and are provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Vital Statistics System. This measure is an estimate of the average number of children a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 women would birth if the age-specific birth rates were observed in a given year. It is calculated by multiplying the sum of these age-specific fertility rates by five. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases or events per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than ten cases or events.

Infant Mortality

Average Annual Number of Infant Deaths

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure is a count of deaths which occurred in infants younger than one year of age; the presented data are averages over a five year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider deaths because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Average Annual Number of Neonatal Deaths

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificates provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure is a count of deaths which occurred in infants younger than 28 days old; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider deaths because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Average Annual Number of Perinatal Deaths

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure is a count of deaths which occurred in fetuses and infants from between 28 days of gestation to seven days after birth; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider deaths because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Average Annual Number of Postneonatal Deaths

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure is a count of deaths which occurred in infants 28 days to less than one year of age; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider deaths because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Infant Mortality Rate per 1,000 Live Births

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure includes the number of deaths which occurred in infants younger than one year of age divided by all live births; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Neonatal Mortality Rate per 1,000 Live Births

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure includes the number of deaths which occurred in infants younger than 28 days old divided by all live births; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Perinatal Mortality Rate per 1,000 Live Births

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure includes the number of deaths which occurred in fetuses and infants from between 28 weeks of gestation to seven days after birth; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Postneonatal Mortality Rate per 1,000 Live Births

These data are collected from linked birth and death certificate data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This measure includes the number of deaths which occurred in infants 28 days to less than one year of age divided by all live births; the presented data are averages over a five-year time period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Low Birthweight (<2,500 Grams)

Number of Live Term Singleton Births (Counts)

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure is a count of live singleton births at term (≤ 37 weeks of gestation) with a birthweight less than 2,500 grams. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases or events. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider low birthweight outcomes because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more cases simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Percent of Live Term Singleton Births

These data are are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure includes the number of live singleton births at term (≤ 37 weeks of gestation) with a birthweight less than 2,500 grams divided by the total number of live singleton births. Low birthweight is expressed as a percentage of all live births. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Preterm (37 Weeks Gestation)

Number of Live Singleton Births (Counts)

These data are collected from birth certificates provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure is a count of live singleton births before 37 weeks of gestation. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider prematurity because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more deaths simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Percent of Live Singleton Births

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure includes the number of live singleton births before 37 weeks of gestation divided by the total number of live singleton births. Prematurity is expressed as a percentage of all live births. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Sex Ratio

Male to Female Sex Ratio at Birth (Term Singleton Only)

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure is calculated by dividing male births by female births; only live singleton term (≤ 37 weeks of gestation) births are included. A rate of 1.000 indicates that an equal number of male and female infants were born in a given year. 

Very Low Birthweight (<1,500 Grams)

Average Annual Number of Live Singleton Births

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure is a count of live singleton births at term (≤ 37 weeks of gestation) with a birthweight less than 1,500 grams. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. This measure is presented as an average over a five-year period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider low birthweight outcomes because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more cases simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparison between counties.

Average Annual Percent of Live Singleton Births

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure includes the number of live singleton births at term (≤ 37 weeks of gestation) with a birthweight less than 1,500 grams divided by the total number of singleton infants live born. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. This is expressed as an average percentage over a five-year period. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Very Preterm (<32 Weeks Gestation)

Average Annual Number of Live Singleton Births

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure is a count of live singleton births before 32 weeks of gestation; it is presented as an annual average over a five-year period. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases. Please note that counts are a statistically limited way to consider prematurity because they do not allow for accurate comparison between counties. Counties with higher populations, such as Milwaukee, will have more cases simply because they have more people. A rate is a better measure for true comparisons between counties.

Average Annual Percent of Live Singleton Births

These data are collected from birth certificates and provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System. This measure includes the number of live singleton births before 32 weeks of gestation divided by the total number of live singleton births. It is expressed as a percentage of all live births. Gestational age is determined by an algorithm that uses the clinician's estimate of gestational age and the mother's last reported normal menses. Prior to 2008, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network suppressed data for counties with fewer than six cases per 100,000 to protect confidentiality. However, counties with zero cases were not suppressed. Since 2008, data has been suppressed for all counties with fewer than 10 cases.

Toxic Air Emissions

Read frequently asked questions about the toxic air emissions data

Facilities Reported

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). These data represent the number of industrial facilities within the specified geographic area that have reached or exceeded the reportable level in the chosen year for the specific contaminant or contaminants of interest. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more, visit the Department of Natural Resources website.

Acrolein

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for acrolein is 75 pounds per year (0.0375 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of acrolein emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect pollution sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding.  To learn more, visit the CDC website.

Acrylonitrile

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for acrylonitrile is 13.1 pounds per year (0.00655 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of acrylonitrile emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ammonia

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ammonia is 4,097 pounds per year (2.0485 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ammonia emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Arsenic

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for arsenic, including elemental and inorganic compounds, is 0.207 pounds per year (0.0001035 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of arsenic emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Benzene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for benzene is 114 pounds per year (0.057 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of benzene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Benzidine

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for benzidine is 0.0133 pounds per year (0.00000665 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of benzidine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Beryllium

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for beryllium, including beryllium compounds, is 0.37 pounds per year (0.000185 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of beryllium emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

1,3-Butadiene (Butadiene - 1,3)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for 1,3-Butadiene is 3.17 pounds per year (0.001585 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of 1,3-Butadiene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Cadmium

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for cadmium, including cadmium compounds, is 0.494 pounds per year (0.000247 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of cadmium emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Chlorine

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for chlorine is 341 pounds per year (0.1705 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of chlorine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of chlorine emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county and census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Chromium (Metals and Other)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for chromium (metals and other) is 118 pounds per year (0.059 tons/year). Chromium (metals and other) includes chromium metals and compounds other than chromium (VI). These data represent the sum total of chromium (metal and other) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Chromium (VI)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Chromium (VI) includes chromium (VI) compounds and particulates, chromic acid mists, and dissolved chromium (VI) aerosols. Among this combination of compounds, the lowest reportable level is 0.074 pounds per year (0.000037 tons/year). The measures on the portal use this value as the threshold for combined chromium (VI). These data represent the sum total of chromium (VI) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ethanolamine

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ethanolamine is 1,763 pounds per year (0.8815 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ethanolamine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ethylbenzene

​These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ethylbenzene is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ethyl benzene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

2-Ethoxyethanol

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for 2-ethoxyethanol (also known as ethylene glycol monoethyl ether, EGEE, or Cellosolve) is 4,336 pounds per year (2.168 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of 2-ethoxyethanol emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Ethylene Oxide

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for ethylene oxide is 10.1 pounds per year (0.00505 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of ethylene oxide emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Formaldehyde

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for formaldehyde is 68.3 pounds per year (0.03415 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of formaldehyde emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Hydrogen Sulfide

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for hydrogen sulfide is 3,279 pounds per year (1.6395 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of hydrogen sulfide emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Lead

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for lead, including lead (metal) and lead compounds, is 400 pounds per year (0.2 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of lead emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Mercury (Alkyl)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for alkyl mercury compounds is 2.35 pounds per year (0.001175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of mercury (alkyl) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Mercury (Aryl)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for aryl mercury compounds is 23.5 pounds per year (0.01175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of mercury (aryl) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Mercury (Inorganic Forms)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for inorganic forms of mercury, including metallic mercury, is 5.88 pounds per year (0.00294 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of mercury (inorganic forms) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and emissions from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Methylene Chloride

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for methylene chloride (also known as dichloromethane) is 1,890 pounds per year (0.945 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of methylene chloride emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county and census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Naphthalene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for naphthalene is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of naphthalene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Nitric Acid

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for nitric acid is 1,213 pounds per year (0.6065 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of nitric acid emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Perchloroethylene (PERC)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for perchloroethylene (also known as tetrachloroethylene) is 151 pounds per year (0.0755 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of perchloroethylene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Phenol

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for phenol is 4,528 pounds per year (2.264 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of phenol emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Phosphoric Acid

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for phosphoric acid is 235 pounds per year (0.1175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of phosphoric acid emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Stoddard Solvent

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for Stoddard solvent (also known as mineral spirits) is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of Stoddard solvent emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Styrene (Monomer)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for styrene (monomer) is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of styrene (monomer) emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Sulfuric Acid

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for sulfuric acid is 235 pounds per year (0.1175 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of sulfuric acid emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-2,3,7,8 (TCDD)

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for TCDD (2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) is 0.00005 pounds per year (0.000000025 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of TCDD emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Toluene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for toluene (also known as toluol) is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of toluene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Trichloroethylene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for trichloroethylene (also known as trichloroethene) is 444 pounds per year (0.222 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of trichloroethylene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Triethanolamine

These data comes from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for triethanolamine is 1,176 pounds per year (0.588 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of triethanolamine emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Vinyl Chloride

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for vinyl chloride is 101 pounds per year (0.0505 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of vinyl chloride emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Xylene

These data come from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Under Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 438.03 (Air Contaminant Emissions Inventory Reporting Requirements), industrial facilities in Wisconsin must report air contaminant emissions when emissions exceed reportable levels. Since 2004, the reportable level for xylene, including mixtures and isomers, xylol, and dimethyl benzene, is 6,000 pounds per year (3 tons/year). These data represent the sum total of xylene emissions from all facilities that exceeded the reportable level, within the chosen year and geographic boundary. Note that the data capture only reportable levels of contaminant emissions. The data exclude emissions less than the reportable level, from indirect sources, and from non-industrial sources. State data are greater than summed county or census tract data because of limitations in geocoding. To learn more about this compound and its health effects, visit the CDC website.

Water (Public Water Quality)

Read frequently asked questions about the public water quality data

Public Water Use

Number of People Receiving Water from Community Water Systems

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors the number of people receiving water from community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round.

Arsenic

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. In 2001, EPA reduced the regulatory drinking water Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic from 0.05 ppm to 0.01 ppm. The current MCL is also represented as 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum arsenic concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-10, >10-20, >20-30, and >30 μg/L arsenic. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. In 2001, EPA reduced the regulatory drinking water Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic from 0.05 ppm to 0.01 ppm. The current MCL is also represented as 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) arsenic concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-10, >10-20, >20-30, and >30 μg/L arsenic. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. In 2001, EPA reduced the regulatory drinking water Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic from 0.05 ppm to 0.01 ppm. The current MCL is also represented as 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum arsenic concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-10, >10-20, >20-30, and >30 μg/L arsenic. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. In 2001, EPA reduced the regulatory drinking water Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic from 0.05 ppm to 0.01 ppm. The current MCL is also represented as 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) arsenic concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-10, >10-20, >20-30, and >30 μg/L arsenic. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Atrazine

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for atrazine is 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum atrazine concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-3, >3-4, and >4 μg/L atrazine. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for atrazine is 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) atrazine concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-3, >3-4, and >4 μg/L atrazine. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for atrazine is 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) atrazine concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-3, >3-4, and >4 μg/L atrazine. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for atrazine is 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum atrazine concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-3, >3-4, and >4 μg/L atrazine. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for atrazine is 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) atrazine concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-3, >3-4, and >4 μg/L atrazine. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for atrazine is 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) atrazine concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-3, >3-4, and >4 μg/L atrazine. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

DEHP

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is 6 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum DEHP concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-2, >2-4, >4-6, >6-10, and >10 μg/L DEHP. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is 6 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) DEHP concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-2, >2-4, >4-6, >6-10, and >10 μg/L DEHP. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is 6 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum DEHP concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-2, >2-4, >4-6, >6-10, and >10 μg/L DEHP. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is 6 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) DEHP concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-2, >2-4, >4-6, >6-10, and >10 μg/L DEHP. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

HAA5

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for haloacetic acids (HAA5) is 60 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum HAA5 concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-15, >15-30, >30-45, >45-60, >60-75, and >75 μg/L HAA5. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for haloacetic acids (HAA5) is 60 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) HAA5 concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-15, >15-30, >30-45, >45-60, >60-75, and >75 μg/L HAA5. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for haloacetic acids (HAA5) is 60 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) HAA5 concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-15, >15-30, >30-45, >45-60, >60-75, and >75 μg/L HAA5. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for haloacetic acids (HAA5) is 60 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum HAA5 concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-15, >15-30, >30-45, >45-60, >60-75, and >75 μg/L HAA5. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for haloacetic acids (HAA5) is 60 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) HAA5 concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-15, >15-30, >30-45, >45-60, >60-75, and >75 μg/L HAA5. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for haloacetic acids (HAA5) is 60 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) HAA5 concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-15, >15-30, >30-45, >45-60, >60-75, and >75 μg/L HAA5. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Nitrate

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate is 10 parts per million (or 10 milligrams per liter [mg/L]). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum nitrate concentration in mg/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, >10-20, and >20 mg/L nitrate. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate is 10 parts per million (or 10 milligrams per liter [mg/L]). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) nitrate concentration in mg/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, >10-20, and >20 mg/L nitrate. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate is 10 parts per million (or 10 milligrams per liter [mg/L]). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) nitrate concentration in mg/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, >10-20, and >20 mg/L nitrate. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate is 10 parts per million (or 10 milligrams per liter [mg/L]). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum nitrate concentration in mg/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, >10-20, and >20 mg/L nitrate. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate is 10 parts per million (or 10 milligrams per liter [mg/L]). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) nitrate concentration in mg/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, >10-20, and >20 mg/L nitrate. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate is 10 parts per million (or 10 milligrams per liter [mg/L]). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) nitrate concentration in mg/L . Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, >10-20, and >20 mg/L nitrate. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

PCE

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum PCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L PCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) PCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L PCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum PCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L PCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) PCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L PCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Radium

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (pCi/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radium is 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum radium concentration in pCi/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, and >10 pCi/L radium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (pCi/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radium is 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) radium concentration in pCi/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, and >10 pCi/L radium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (pCi/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radium is 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum radium concentration in pCi/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, and >10 pCi/L radium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (pCi/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radium is 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) radium concentration in pCi/L. Cut points are 0-3, >3-5, >5-10, and >10 pCi/L radium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

TCE

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trichloroethylene (TCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum TCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L TCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trichloroethylene (TCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) TCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L TCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trichloroethylene (TCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum TCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L TCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trichloroethylene (TCE) is 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) TCE concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-1, >1-2, >2-5, and >5 μg/L TCE. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

TTHM

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trihalomethanes (TTMH) is 80 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum TTHM concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-20, >20-40, >40-60, >60-80, >80-100, and >100 μg/L TTHM. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trihalomethanes (TTMH) is 80 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) TTHM concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-20, >20-40, >40-60, >60-80, >80-100, and >100 μg/L TTHM. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trihalomethanes (TTMH) is 80 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) TTHM concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-20, >20-40, >40-60, >60-80, >80-100, and >100 μg/L TTHM. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trihalomethanes (TTMH) is 80 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum TTHM concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-20, >20-40, >40-60, >60-80, >80-100, and >100 μg/L TTHM. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trihalomethanes (TTMH) is 80 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) TTHM concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-20, >20-40, >40-60, >60-80, >80-100, and >100 μg/L TTHM. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L), Quarterly

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for trihalomethanes (TTMH) is 80 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the quarterly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean (average) TTHM concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-20, >20-40, >40-60, >60-80, >80-100, and >100 μg/L TTHM. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Uranium

Number of Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium is 30 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by maximum uranium concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-15, >15-30, and >30 μg/L uranium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current maximum contaminant level (MCL) for uranium is 30 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of community water systems by mean (average) uranium concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-15, >15-30, and >30 μg/L uranium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Maximum Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium is 30 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by maximum uranium concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-15, >15-30, and >30 μg/L uranium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Number of People Served by Community Water Systems by Mean Concentrations (μg/L)

These data are from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) online public water query system. The DNR monitors for substances in accordance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Drinking water concentrations are based on samples taken from public community water systems. A community water system is a public water system which supplies water to the same population year-round. A water sample is designated as "non-detect" when the laboratory analysis cannot detect the analyte being measured. The current Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium is 30 micrograms per liter (μg/L). These data illustrate the yearly distribution of the number of people served by community water systems by mean uranium concentration in μg/L. Cut points are 0-5, >5-15, >15-30, and >30 μg/L uranium. Measures do not account for the variability in sampling, numbers of sampling repeats, and variability within systems. Concentrations in drinking water cannot be directly converted to exposure, because water consumption varies by climate, level of physical activity, and between people.

Last Revised: January 28, 2019