Small Talks: Partner Resources

We are proud to collaborate with local programs and volunteers making a difference in communities across the state. Right now, partners and community members like you are working to educate parents and other caring adults about the dangers of underage drinking. You’re helping to reduce underage drinking in Wisconsin, and the Small Talks campaign is here to help. Together, we can help more Wisconsin kids grow up healthy and alcohol-free.

What are the key messages of this campaign? Small Talks: Talking Points, P-02700N (PDF)

A mother and daughter playing a video game

Use the DHS Alcohol Use: Youth Population data dashboard to show underage drinking patterns in Wisconsin.

Toolkit

Help parents and other caring adults throughout Wisconsin understand the importance of talking with kids about underage drinking early and often. Use these Small Talks campaign materials in your community. Some materials are available in multiple languages.

Get Small Talks materials shipped to you at no cost!

  • Cooler door sign
  • Fridge lock
  • Handouts/fact sheets
  • Magnet
  • Pin/button
  • Posters
  • Sticker
  • Vinyl banner
  • Yard signs/lawn signs

Place your order today

Advertising

Billboards

Promote the Small Talks campaign through outdoor advertising. Several billboard designs are available. Contact us for more information.

Digital display banners

Examples of the Small Talks online display ads in a collagePromote the Small Talks campaign through graphic advertising on apps and the internet. Use one of the Small Talks campaign digital display banners. The digital display banners are available in many designs and sizes:

  • 300 pixels x 250 pixels
  • 300 pixels x 600 pixels
  • 728 pixels x 90 pixels
  • 320 pixels x 50 pixels (mobile advertising)

Contact us for copies of the digital display banners.

Live read public service announcements for radio stations

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your local radio stations. Share these live read public service announcements with them. 

:30 Tough Questions
Having short, casual talks about underage drinking can make a difference – and [Local Organization Name] is helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions, like: “Did you drink when you were a kid?” and “If alcohol is bad, why do you drink?” Get the answers to these common questions – along tips on how to teach kids to say “no” to alcohol in peer-pressure situations – at SmallTalksWI.org. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services and [Local Organization Name].


:15 Tough Questions
Having short, casual talks about underage drinking can make a difference – and [Local Organization Name] is helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions, like: “Did you drink when you were a kid?” Get the answers at SmallTalksWI.org. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services and [Local Organization Name].
 



:30 Peer Pressure Practice
Unfortunately, you can’t always prevent your child from being offered alcohol, but you can help them be prepared if it happens. All it takes is a little practice. Start by sitting down with your child and brainstorming responses they’re comfortable saying, such as “No, thanks, I have a game tomorrow,” or “That’s okay, I’m allergic to alcohol.” Then, do a little role play to help them try it out. A little prep goes a long way. Get more tips like these at SmallTalksWI.org. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services and [Local Organization Name].


:15 Peer Pressure Practice
Unfortunately, you can’t always prevent your child from being offered alcohol, but you can help them be prepared if it happens. All it takes is a little brainstorming and practice – and that prep session is sure to go a long way. Learn how – along with other tips – at SmallTalksWI.org. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services and [Local Organization Name].
 



:30 Cancer Risk
I just found out that the more alcohol a person drinks and the earlier in life they start, the higher their risk for at least seven different types of cancer can climb! That’s real. And it’s inspiring me to talk to the kids in my life about the link between underage drinking and cancer. Having short, casual conversations with children about alcohol and its connection to cancer, starting around age 8, can make a big difference. And it’s easier than you think! For tips on how you can get started, visit SmallTalksWI.org.

:15 Cancer Risk
Did you know drinking alcohol increases your cancer risk? That’s why I’m talking to the kids in my life about the dangers of underage drinking. Because research shows that kids really listen! And it’s easier than you think. Find talk tips, alcohol facts, and more at SmallTalksWI.org.

Radio commercials/PSAs

Promote the Small Talks campaign through commercials/PSAs on your local radio station or streaming audio services. Two :30 produced spots are available. These commercials are available in English only.

Contact us with questions or concerns about these commercials.

Pre-roll/bumper videos

Promote the Small Talks campaign using paid advertising on YouTube or other streaming video platforms with these pre-roll/bumper videos. These videos highlight the key points of this campaign. Contact us with questions or concerns about these videos.

:06 videos

Early as age 8: Have small talks with kids about alcohol as early as age 8.

Start young: The younger you have conversations about alcohol with kids, the more likely they are to come and talk to you about it when they are older.

Let that fear go: It’s normal conversation that should be happening in all families.


:10 videos

Learning opportunities: Small talks about alcohol can help kids and parents’ relationships grow.

Keeping kids safe: Small talks with kids about alcohol keeps them safe from the dangers of underage drinking.

Make a difference: Small talks with kids about alcohol helps them deal with hard situations.

Community, media, public relations

Campaign logo

We encourage you to use the Small Talks campaign logo on materials you create promoting this campaign. When using the Small Talks logo on websites and social media, always include a link to the campaign website (smalltalkswi.org). Additionally, the logo can serve as a hyperlink to the campaign website. Use this version of the logo. Contact us if this logo file does not suit your needs. Place the logo against a white or light background to increase contrast and legibility. Leave white space around the logo when placing it on materials you create. Do alter the logo in any way, including separating the elements or distorting its dimensions.

Drop-in articles (Church bulletins, employee newsletters, school newsletters, email blasts)

Promote the Small Talks campaign in local church bulletins, employee/company newsletters, organization newsletters, school newsletters, and/or through email blasts. Use one of the drop-in articles below. Contact us with questions or concerns about these drop-in articles.

Small Talks: How Wisconsin prevents underage drinking

Alcohol can do lasting damage to a kid’s growing brain, impacting everything from how they learn and make decisions to how they handle emotions. But you don’t need a big speech to help a kid understand the dangers of underage drinking. Start small instead. Having a lot of small, causal talks—at the store, in the drive-thru, or between video games—can make a big difference in a kid’s health. Start around age eight to prepare kids to make a lifetime of healthy decisions. Visit SmallTalksWI.org for talk tips, facts, and more. This campaign is sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

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Learn how to talk with kids about underage drinking

Kids who drink alcohol are more likely to have problems at school, with their friends, and with the law. Worse, alcohol can harm kids’ physical and mental health. But you don’t need a big speech to help a kid understand the dangers of underage drinking. Start small instead. Having a lot of small, casual talks—at the store, in the drive-thru, or between video games—can make a big difference in a kid’s health. Start around age eight to prepare kids to make a lifetime of healthy decisions. Relax. Talk. Listen. Repeat. Visit SmallTalksWI.org for talk tips, facts, and more. This campaign is sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. 

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Help kids grow up alcohol-free: Have small talks

Small talks about underage drinking can make a difference in a kid’s choices. That’s because kids really do listen. Research shows having frequent, casual conversations about alcohol, starting around age 8, can be a lot more effective—and a lot less intimidating—than one super serious discussion. So, start talking. Keep listening. Help give a kid the confidence to grow up alcohol-free. Visit SmallTalksWI.org for talk tips, facts, and more. This campaign is sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. 

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Now is a great time to talk with youth about alcohol

Research shows that having frequent, casual conversations about the dangers of alcohol can make a big difference in your kid’s choices. However, once your small talks get started, you may get hit with some tough questions, like, “If alcohol is so bad, why do you drink wine?” But don’t sweat it. [INSERT NAME OF YOUR ORGANIZATION] is partnering with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to help. We’ve put together more tips, more tools and more answers to tough questions, such as, “Did you drink when you were a kid?” and “What if my friends ask me to drink?” and “Why do I need to wait until I’m 21?" These new resources are part of Small Talks, a campaign from Wisconsin Department of Health Services, which encourages adults to have short, casual conversations with kids frequently, starting at age 8 on the dangers of drinking alcohol before the age of 21. To access the resources go to the Small Talks website at SmallTalksWI.org. Then, share your small talks moments on social media using #SmallTalksWI.

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Because you care about kids, you care about underage drinking

Changing Wisconsin’s alcohol culture in which drinking is an expected as a rite of passage isn’t just possible—it’s happening now, in small ways all over the state. Small Talks is an underage drinking campaign from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. It encourages parents and other caring adults to have frequent, casual conversations with kids, starting around age 8, about the dangers of drinking alcohol before the age of 21. The dangers are real: alcohol can damage the brain and body, young drinkers take costly risks, alcohol is linked to mental health problems, and most underage drinking is binge drinking, which compounds the health and safety risks. Research shows that these non-judgmental small talks can be a lot more effective—and a lot less intimidating—than one super serious discussion. What can you do?

  • Go to SmallTalksWI.org for the latest Wisconsin underage drinking facts, talk tips, and more.
  • Use the information from SmallTalksWI.org to have small talks with the kids in your life.
  • Sign up to receive the quarterly Small Talks email newsletter at SmallTalksWI.org.
  • Share Small Talks campaign resources with parents and other caring adults in your community.
  • Promote the Small Talks campaign on your social media channels. Tag all posts with #SmallTalksWI. 

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New partnerships link underage drinking and cancer, helps parents talk to kids

We’re excited to announce that the [YOUR ORGANIZATION] is partnering with the Wisconsin Cancer Collaborative and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services’ Small Talks underage drinking prevention campaign to raise awareness about alcohol and its associated cancer risk. Together, our aim is to prevent underage drinking and reduce the burden of cancer in our communities.

Only 30% of adults are aware that alcohol increases the risk for at least seven types of cancer: mouth, throat, voice box, esophagus, liver, colorectal, and breast cancer. The more alcohol a person drinks and the earlier in life they start, the higher their cancer risk. That’s one of the many reasons it’s critical to prevent underage drinking.

Want to take action in your community? Taking small steps, like avoiding excessive drinking, offering guests nonalcoholic options when you host, and modeling responsible alcohol-related behaviors for kids at home can help.

Research shows that having short, casual conversations with kids about the dangers of alcohol, starting around age 8, can make a big difference in a child’s choices. Help protect Wisconsin’s kids and reduce the burden of cancer on our communities. Visit SmallTalksWI.org for take action tips and to learn more about the link between cancer and alcohol. Then, share your small talks moments on social media using #SmallTalksWI.

Electronic/email newsletter

Promote the Small Talks campaign by encouraging people to sign up for our email list. We publish a newsletter four times a year with the latest information about this campaign, including information on new data, resources, and talk tips. Contact us with questions or concerns about this quarterly newsletter.

Newsletter archive

2021

2020

Press release samples

Promote the Small Talks campaign in local media. Use one of these sample press releases. 

Email the completed press release to your local newspapers (including shopper publications), radio stations, and TV stations. Use local statistics if you have them. Don't forget to include contact information for your organization. Contact us with questions or concerns about this press release sample.

Your local media may wish to interview you about this campaign. To prepare for local media interviews, review the follow resources:

Proclamation sample

Promote the Small Talks campaign by obtaining a proclamation from your county board, school board, city council, village board, or town board. Use this sample as your guide (Word). Proclamations often take several days to weeks to process. Contact us with questions or concerns about this proclamation sample.

Website buttons

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your website. Add a Small Talks website button to your website. This button appears as an image on your website. When a visitor to your website clicks or taps the image, the visitor is directed to the Small Talks homepage for resources and information. Contact us with questions or concerns about these website buttons.

Instructions

Choose a size Determine the website button size that would best fit on your website. The website button is available in three sizes: 550 pixels x 300 pixels, 400 pixels x 240 pixels, and 330 pixels x 180 pixels.
Copy code Highlight the embed code listed below for the size that you want, then copy it into your clipboard.
Decide on a location

As editor, in your content management system, open the page that you would like to add the website button to and either open the text tab or the HTML viewer.

As an editor, you will be embedding this website button the same way you would an image or video. Note: Every content management system is different. This process can vary slightly.

Paste code and save Paste the embed code snippet you just copied into your HTML viewer or text tab. Then click "OK" or "Save." Be sure you’re not pasting it within another snippet of code – otherwise you will see errors on the webpage. This step is the same regardless of content management system.
Review, adjust, and publish After saving this code within the content management system, review how the button lives on the page. You can format this image to be left aligned, center aligned, or right aligned based on preference. Once satisfied with the orientation, publish your changes and the website button is now added to your website and ready for immediate use.

 

Button designs and code

330x180

330x180 button for partner websites that reads Small Talks. Big Difference. Learn how to talk with kids about underage drinking

<a href="https://smalltalkswi.org/" target="_blank"><img alt="" height="180" src="/%3Ca%20href%3D"https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/sites/default/files/st-web-button-330x180.png">https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/sites/default/files/st-web-button-330x180.png" width="330" /></a>


400x240

400x240 button for partner websites that reads Small Talks. Big Difference. Learn how to talk with kids about underage drinking

<a href="https://smalltalkswi.org/" target="_blank"><img alt="" height="240" src="/%3Ca%20href%3D"https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/sites/default/files/st-web-button-400x240.png">https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/sites/default/files/st-web-button-400x240.png" width="400" /></a>


550x300


550x300 button for partner websites that reads Small Talks. Big Difference. Learn how to talk with kids about underage drinking

<a href="https://smalltalkswi.org/" target="_blank"><img alt="" height="300" src="https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/sites/default/files/st-web-button-550x300.png" width="550" /></a>

Promotional items

Fridge lock

Promote the Small Talks campaign by handing out fridge locks at community events. One option is available featuring the Small Talks logo. Use our ordering portal to get fridge locks shipped to you at no cost

Magnet

Promote the Small Talks campaign by displaying and/handing out magnets. One design is available in English that measures 5 inches by 8 inches. Use our ordering portal to get magnets shipped to you at no cost

Pin/button

Promote the Small Talks campaign by wearing and/or handing out pins/buttons. One option is available in English that measures two inch diameter. Use our ordering portal to get pins/buttons shipped to you at no cost.

Sticker

Promote the Small Talks campaign by displaying and/or handing out stickers. One option is available in English that measures three inches by three inches. Use our ordering portal to get rolls of stickers shipped to you at no cost.

Publications

Handouts (fact sheets)

Promote the key messages of the Small Talks campaign by sharing these handouts. Each handout measures 8.5 inches by 11 inches. You can print them on your home or office printer. Contact us with questions or concerns about these handouts.


Fast facts, P-02600
Available in English, Spanish, and Hmong

Screen shot of the Small Talks fast facts document

Talk tips, P-02600A
Available in English, Spanish, and Hmong

Screen shot of the Small Talks talk tips document

Both of these handouts are available in alternate designs (English only) featuring different photos. All of the information in the alternate designs is the same as the original designs. 



 

Posters

Promote the Small Talks campaign by displaying and distributing these posters in your community. These posters measure 8.5 inches by 11 inches. You can print these posters on your home and/or office printer. Contact us with questions or concerns about these posters.

Poster 1, P-02600F (PDF)
(English only)

Poster of dad with son working on a bicycle

Poster 2, P-02600G
(English and Hmong)

Poster of mom with daughter playing a video game

Poster 3, P-02600H (PDF)
(English and Spanish)

Poster of mom with son eating breakfast

 

 

Poster 4, P-02600I
(English and Spanish)

Poster of dad with daughter using a tablet

Poster 5, P-02600J (PDF)
(English only)

Poster of daughter with mom eating lunch

Poster 6, P-02600K
(English and Spanish)

Poster of son with dad playing guitar

 

Poster 7, P-02600L (PDF)
(English only)

Poster of dad with son talking on a bench

Poster 8, P-02963 (PDF)
(English only)

Poster of man and child at a picnic

Poster 9, P-02964 (PDF)
(English only)

Poster of woman and child at a sporting event

Poster 10, P-02965 (PDF)
(English only)

Poster of man and child high-fiving

Signage

Cooler door sign

Promote the Small Talks campaign by placing moisture resistant signs on cooler doors at businesses that sell alcohol. One design is available in English that measures 8 inches by 6.25 inches. Use our ordering portal to get signs shipped to you at no cost

Vinyl banner

Promote the Small Talks campaign by displaying a vinyl banner. One design is available in English that measures 35 inches by 96 inches. Use our ordering portal to get a banner shipped to you at no cost

Window cling

Promote the Small Talks campaign by placing this cling in the windows of your car, home, office, and/or school. The window cling measures 4 inches by 3.25 inches. Use our ordering portal to get window clings shipped to you at no cost

The window cling is available in English, Spanish, and Hmong.

Small Talks window cling with the message: What a great moment to talk with your kid about alcohol. Get underage drinking talk facts, tips, and more at smalltalkswi.org

Yard signs/lawn signs

Promote the Small Talks campaign by placing one of these signs in the yard of your business, home, office, and/or school. Consider working with counties, cities, villages, and towns to place these signs in parks and other public spaces where families congregate. These signs are 18 inches wide and 24 inches tall. Use our ordering portal to get yard signs/lawn signs shipped to you at no cost

Version A, P-02600B (PDF)

Small Talks lawn sign with the message: Relax. Talk. Listen. Repeat. Get underage drinking talk facts, tips, and more at smalltalkswi.org


Version B, P-02600C

This sign is available in English, Spanish, and Hmong.

Small Talks lawn sign with message: Right now is a great moment to talk with your kid about alcohol. Get underage drinking talk facts, tips, and more at smalltalkswi.org

There is an alternate design for this sign that includes a photo of a man and child (PDF). The alternate design is available in English only.


Version C, P-02600D (PDF)

Small Talks lawn sign with the message: Small talks are making a big difference right here. Get underage drinking talk facts, tips, and more at smalltalkswi.org

Social media posts

Facebook frame

Promote the Small Talks campaign by using the Small Talks campaign Facebook frame on your personal, business, and/or organization's Facebook page profile picture. Follow these instructions.

  1. Go to www.facebook.com/profilepicframes.
  2. Select your profile picture in the bottom left and select your page.
  3. Search for the Small Talks campaign Facebook Frame by entering Small Talks Wisconsin
  4. Choose the Small Talks campaign Facebook Frame.
  5. Select Use as Profile Picture.

Facebook posts - Cancer (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Facebook page. Use the posts below.  

Instructions

  1. Save the image to your device.
  2. Upload the image to your Facebook page.
  3. Use the text below the image to complete the post. 

Mom and daughter on a kayak

Alcohol increases the risk for mouth, throat, voice box, esophagus, liver, colorectal, and breast cancer. That’s seven more reasons to talk with your kids about the dangers of underage drinking. Need help getting started? SmallTalksWI.org has small talk tips and more. #SmallTalksWI


Father and son in a tent

Did you know that the more alcohol a person drinks and the earlier in life they start, the higher their risk of cancer? It’s true—and it makes having short, casual talks with kids about the dangers of alcohol even more important. It really works. Get small talk tips SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI


Father and daughter at a picnic

Small, casual talks about the dangers of underage drinking can make a big difference. That’s because kids really do listen. Research shows that starting around age 8 can help kids make positive choices—and reduce their risk for cancer. Learn more and get tips at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI


Mom and daughter sitting on a sofa

Want to prevent underage drinking and help kids lower their risk for alcohol-related cancers? Have small talks. We can help you get ready to answer kids’ tough questions, like “Did you drink when you were a kid?” or “Why do I need to wait until I’m 21?” at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI

Instagram posts - Cancer (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Instagram feed. Use the posts below.  

Instructions

  1. Save the image to your device.
  2. Upload the image to your Instagram feed.
  3. Use the text below the image to complete the post. 

Mom and daughter on a kayak

Alcohol increases the risk for mouth, throat, voice box, esophagus, liver, colorectal, and breast cancer. That’s seven more reasons to talk with your kids about the dangers of underage drinking. Need help getting started? SmallTalksWI.org has small talk tips and more. #SmallTalksWI


Father and son in a tent

Did you know that the more alcohol a person drinks and the earlier in life they start, the higher their risk of cancer? It’s true—and it makes having short, casual talks with kids about the dangers of alcohol even more important. It really works. Get small talk tips SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI


Father and daughter at a picnic

Small, casual talks about the dangers of underage drinking can make a big difference. That’s because kids really do listen. Research shows that starting around age 8 can help kids make positive choices—and reduce their risk for cancer. Learn more and get tips at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI


Mom and daughter sitting on a sofa

Want to prevent underage drinking and help kids lower their risk for alcohol-related cancers? Have small talks. We can help you get ready to answer kids’ tough questions, like “Did you drink when you were a kid?” or “Why do I need to wait until I’m 21?” at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI

Facebook posts - Headline Images (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Instagram feed. Use the posts below.  

Instructions

  1. Save the image to your device.
  2. Upload the image to your Instagram feed.
  3. Use the text below the image to complete the post.

Lock it up!

2 out of 3 teens say it’s easy to take alcohol from home. Caregivers who lock up their alcohol help prevent underage drinking. Get the facts at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI


More talks. Less drinking

About 90% of underage drinking is binge drinking. Talking to kids early can lead to healthy choices about alcohol. Get talk tips at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI  


Prevention starts early

65% of Wisconsin teens have tried alcohol. Talking with kids early makes a big impact on their future choices about alcohol. Get talk tips at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI 


Drinking affects thinking

Underage drinking can affect how kids’ brains develop. Alcohol damages areas responsible for learning, memory, and more. Get the facts at SmallTalksWI.org. #SmallTalksWI

Facebook posts - Questions (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Facebook page. Use the posts below.  

Instructions

  1. Save the image to your device.
  2. Upload the image to your Facebook page.
  3. Use the text below the image to complete the post. 

Did you drink as a kid

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. Don’t let your past stop you from being honest with your child. If you drank as a teenager, acknowledge that it was risky and let them know that, today, much more is known about the harmful effects of alcohol on kids. You could even share stories about the consequences you faced. Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI


What if my friends ask me to drink

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. You can’t always prevent your child from being offered alcohol, but you can help them be prepared if it happens. Brainstorm and practice different responses, such as “No, thanks! I have a game tomorrow.” or “Thanks, but I want to keep a clear head tonight.” Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI


Why do I need to wait until I'm 21 to drink

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. Trying to explain why it’s important to wait? Stay calm and discuss the dangers without scaring your child. Tell them there are several reasons, including that it’s against the law, that drinking can be harmful to their still-developing brain and body, and that young people who drink are more likely to become depressed. Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI


If alcohol is bad, why do you drink

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. Worried about being put on the spot? Explain that, while it is always harmful when children drink, it is safe for most adults if they drink in moderation. “One glass of wine or one beer with dinner can be a nice treat for a grown-up, just like one piece of cake is for you. But I’m careful not to drink too much.” Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI

Instagram posts - Questions (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Instagram feed. Use the posts below.  

Instructions

  1. Save the image to your device.
  2. Upload the image to your Instagram feed.
  3. Use the text below the image to complete the post. 

Did you drink as a kid

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. Don’t let your past stop you from being honest with your child. If you drank as a teenager, acknowledge that it was risky and let them know that, today, much more is known about the harmful effects of alcohol on kids. You could even share stories about the consequences you faced. Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI


What if my friends ask me to drink

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. You can’t always prevent your child from being offered alcohol, but you can help them be prepared if it happens. Brainstorm and practice different responses, such as “No, thanks! I have a game tomorrow.” or “Thanks, but I want to keep a clear head tonight.” Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI


Why do I need to wait until I'm 21 to drink

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. Trying to explain why it’s important to wait? Stay calm and discuss the dangers without scaring your child. Tell them there are several reasons, including that it’s against the law, that drinking can be harmful to their still-developing brain and body, and that young people who drink are more likely to become depressed. Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI


  

If alcohol is bad, why do you drink?

We're helping you answer your kids’ toughest questions about underage drinking. Worried about being put on the spot? Explain that, while it is always harmful when children drink, it is safe for most adults if they drink in moderation. “One glass of wine or one beer with dinner can be a nice treat for a grown-up, just like one piece of cake is for you. But I’m careful not to drink too much.” Get more talk tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/start-talking.htm #SmallTalksWI 

Facebook posts - Videos/Animations (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Facebook page. Come up with your own creative ideas or use the posts below. Use #SmallTalksWI on all social media posts. Contact us with questions or concerns about these Facebook posts.

Note: The short videos are animations with no sound on a continuous loop.
 

Message text Media
Start talking to your kids about underage drinking around age 8—and keep it up as they grow. Learn how at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI

General
Download and post this short video

Your next small talk about underage drinking can happen anywhere: over dinner, in the car, or while you play video games. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #1
Download and post this short video
New school, new friends. Kids can use alcohol to cope with stressful changes. Get them to talk about those feelings instead. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #2
Download and post this short video
You don’t have to be an underage drinking expert to have a small talk. Just visit https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm for talk facts and tips. #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #3
Download and post this short video
Want to start a conversation about underage drinking? Ask about their friends, school lessons, or the ads they see on TV. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #4
Download and post this short video

 

Instagram posts - Videos/Animations (#SmallTalksWI)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's Instagram feed. Come up with your own creative ideas or use the posts below. Use #SmallTalksWI on all social media posts. Contact us with questions or concerns about these Instagram posts.

Note: The short videos are animations with no sound on a continuous loop.
 

Message text Media
Start talking to your kids about underage drinking around age 8—and keep it up as they grow. Learn how at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI

General
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Your next small talk about underage drinking can happen anywhere: over dinner, in the car, or while you play video games. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #1
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New school, new friends. Kids can use alcohol to cope with stressful changes. Get them to talk about those feelings instead. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #2
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You don’t have to be an underage drinking expert to have a small talk. Just visit https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm for talk facts and tips. #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #3
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Want to start a conversation about underage drinking? Ask about their friends, school lessons, or the ads they see on TV. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Talk tip #4
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Videos

Long form (ideal for presentations and websites)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your website or through presentations with local groups using these long-form videos. Contact us with questions or concerns about these long-form videos.

General campaign video (Length: 1 minute)

Watch this video with Spanish subtitles

Tips from talkers videos (Length: 2 to 3 minutes)

This series of videos is designed to encourage parents and other caring adults to talk to the kids in their life about the dangers of underage drinking. There are five videos. Each video explores a key challenge that parents and other caring adults face during their small talks journey, including how to work through stage fright to start having small talks, why preparing for small talks is key, why listening is an important part of small talks, why it is not important for small talks to be perfect, and why having lots of regular small talks over time is more effective than one big talk. These videos are intended to be used on websites. Go to the Small Talks: Tips from Talkers webpage to watch these videos.

Short form (ideal for social media)

Promote the Small Talks campaign on your personal, business, and/or organization's social media pages with these short-form (:30 second) videos. Come up with your own creative posts to go with these short-form videos or use the ideas below. Use #SmallTalksWI on all social media posts. Contact us with questions or concerns about these short-form videos.

Message text Video
Small Talks is how Wisconsin prevents underage drinking. Learn how these parents worked through their stage fright and started having short, frequent, casual conversations with their kids about alcohol. Get talk tips and more here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Nervous? It's natural.
Small Talks is how Wisconsin prevents underage drinking. Learn why these adults believe preparing for their short, frequent, casual conversations with their kids about alcohol is key. Get the facts on underage drinking in Wisconsin: https://smalltalkswi.org/ #SmallTalksWI Getting prepped
Small Talks is how Wisconsin prevents underage drinking. Listening is important when having short, frequent, casual conversations about kids about alcohol. More tips here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Learning to listen
Small Talks is how Wisconsin prevents underage drinking. Hear why it’s not important for your short, frequent, casual conversations about alcohol with kids to be perfect. Get talk tips and more here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Bouncing back
Small Talks is how Wisconsin prevents underage drinking. Hear why having lots of short, casual talks over time about alcohol with kids is more effective than one big talk. Get talk tips and more here: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/small-talks/index.htm #SmallTalksWI Keeping it up

Learn more

Want to keep up with the latest on underage drinking in Wisconsin or find out about innovative programs and best practices? Check out these resources.

Last Revised: August 19, 2021