CCS: Providers

 COVID-19 impact on CCS

Learn how CCS is impacted by COVID-19.

 

The Department of Health Services (DHS) offers technical assistance and support to providers of the Comprehensive Community Services (CCS) program. 

Administrative codes

Certification application

Before applying for certification, perspective regions should submit Request for Approval: Comprehensive Community Services (CCS) Regional Service Model, F-00944, to the Division of Care and Treatment Services.

A county or tribe seeking to operate a certified Comprehensive Community Services (CCS) must apply for certification on an application provided by DHS. Application materials are provided through the Division of Quality Assurance.

Client rights information

The DHS Client Rights Office offers training and other resources to educate providers on the rights of individuals receiving treatment for mental health and/or substance use.

Correcting files

Note: These are only suggestions regarding how to correct documentation when a discrepancy has occurred or when a document has not been completed within the timeframes specified by CCS rules and regulations. The documentation of all factors affecting why a discrepancy has occurred or why a document was not completed within the timeframes required can be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, but are not a guarantee that the documentation provided will not be given a finding during an audit or survey.


Any past discrepancies cannot be fixed retroactively

Past discrepancies can only be considered correct from the date they are amended, moving forward. This leaves the counties and tribes at risk if another audit or survey, of any type, is performed on dates prior to the error(s) being corrected.

Amending files when a discrepancy has been identified

Suggested steps to amend files when a discrepancy has been identified:

  1. Add or adjust any missing or incomplete information on the document being corrected—making sure to note the date the changes are being made—in order to become fully compliant with all CCS rules and regulations.
  2. Create documentation explaining the circumstances of the corrections; again, noting the date the changes have been made.
  3. Once the corrections have been made, all necessary signatures must be re-obtained and dated for the new document to be considered correct.

Examples of unacceptable types of corrections:

  • Back dating any signatures or documents
  • Filling in missing information without indicating when and what additions were made

Amending documents beyond the required timeframe

Suggestions for addressing documents completed beyond the required timeframe as specified in code —for example, Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 36.16(2)(a), which requires that the assessment process and the assessment summary be completed within 30 days of the receipt of an application for services, and Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 36.17(2)(a), which states that a written service plan be completed within 30 days of the consumer’s application for services:

  • Complete the documents as soon as possible.
  • Document any and all reasons, at the time they occur, why the documents could not be completed timely.

As it relates to an audit or survey, this documentation can be reviewed on a case-by-case basis to determine its validity.

Progress notes/functional documents

It is understood that all counties and tribes will have their own internal policies that govern when items, such as progress notes, must be completed.

  • Progress notes will not be given a finding on an audit if they are completed within a reasonable timeframe from the date of service and are fully compliant with all CCS and Medicaid rules and regulations regarding documentation standards.
  • Functional documents, such as the assessment or written service plan, will not be given a finding as long as they are completed within any timeframes specified by CCS rules and regulations. Please review the above section, “Amending documents beyond the required timeframe” for additional information regarding these requirements.

 

Data reporting - PPS

Frequently asked questions

County and tribal staff who have questions regarding Comprehensive Community Services (CCS) may submit their questions by email to DHS DCTS CCS Support.

The Western Region and Recovery Wellness Consortium submitted 16 questions to DCTS in February 2017. View the questions and the answers provided by DCTS staff (PDF).

Functional screen information

Guidance for substance use treatment

This guidance was lasted updated in March 2020.

The three DHS Divisions – Division of Care and Treatment Services, Division of Medicaid Services, and Division of Quality Assurance – that oversee aspects of CCS collaborated on the following guidance regarding the provision of substance use treatment.

Comprehensive Community Services serves individuals with mental health, substance use disorders, or both and provides psychosocial rehabilitation and treatment services, including substance use treatment service category number 13 in the ForwardHealth Update 2014-42. Comprehensive Community Services programs can provide substance use treatment two ways:

The Comprehensive Community Services program can hire or contract a staff person that is on the roster to work directly in the Comprehensive Community Services program to provide substance use treatment to Comprehensive Community Services individuals with substance use disorder.  

  • The need for substance use treatment must be identified and services to be provided must be on the Comprehensive Community Services service plan.
  • The staff person must fit the qualifications of a substance abuse professional.
    • Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 36.10(2)(g)1, 2 (with knowledge of addiction treatment), 4 (with knowledge of psychopharmacology and addiction treatment), 16 (certified alcohol and drug abuse counselors or substance abuse professionals).
    • Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 75.02(84) Substance abuse professionals include: certified substance abuse counselor, substance abuse counselor, substance abuse counselor in training, marriage and family therapy, professional counseling, and Social Worker Examining Board (MPSW) 1.09 specialty.
    • All providers are required to be licensed/certified and acting within their scope of practice.

The Comprehensive Community Services program can contract with a certified Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 75.12 day treatment services and/or certified Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 75.13 outpatient treatment service to provide substance use treatment to Comprehensive Community Services individuals with substance use disorder.  

  • The need for substance use treatment must be identified and services to be provided must be on the Comprehensive Community Services service plan.
  • The Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 75.12 and Wis. Admin. Code § DHS 75.13 services must be provided by staff that fit the qualifications of a substance abuse professional listed above.
  • The Comprehensive Community Services consumer must be dually enrolled in both Comprehensive Community Services and the Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 75 services and both Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 36 and Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 75 rules are followed.
  • Pertinent Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 75 service documentation must be shared with the Comprehensive Community Services program and filed in the Comprehensive Community Services file and retained in the Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 75 file.
  • The individual should be enrolled in only one Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 75 service, unless dual enrollment is indicated by the individual’s assessed needs.

Guidance for tribes

In the past, tribal providers who chose to participate in the CCS Program have been required to submit an annual CCS cost report in order to receive their annual cost settlement payment. All tribes are also Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) and are also required to submit annual cost reports as an FQHC. The annual cost reports for each program are used to ensure that 100 percent of the cost for providing services is reimbursed to the tribe.

In order to simplify the annual process, tribes may dispense with the annual CCS report and simply include CCS costs on their FQHC report. Interim claims for CCS should continue to be billed under procedure codes H2017 and 99199. These claims will be paid at the interim State rate as they are today. The program should continue to follow all requirements as specified in ForwardHealth Update No. 2014-42.

Medicaid information

Memos

Roles of DHS divisions and offices

Three DHS divisions and one office provide oversight of CCS.

DCTS

The Division of Care and Treatment Services (DCTS) supports community mental health and substance use programs and operates seven facilities providing services for mental health and developmental disabilities.

Role of DCTS for CCS: The DCTS Bureau of Prevention Treatment and Recovery (BPTR) provides clarification and technical assistance regarding the structure and content of CCS. BPTR also gathers and analyzes program data and consumer outcomes. 

DMS

The Division of Medicaid Services (DMS) administers the Medicaid and FoodShare programs and provides help to medically needy and low income individuals and families.

Role of DMS for CCS: DMS develops the ForwardHealth online handbook detailing coverage policy for CCS. Policy is written in accordance with federal and state regulations, which may describe requirements not found in Wis. Admin. Code ch. DHS 36. 

DQA

The Division of Quality Assurance (DQA) is responsible for regulating and licensing more than 40 different types of programs, facilities, and caregivers that provide health and residential care.

Role of DQA for CCS: The DQA Behavioral Health Certification Section (BHCS) participates in the review process of proposed regional CCS models, provides application materials for consideration for certification, monitors compliance with CCS and related rules via on-site inspections and desk reviews, and reviews and investigates complaints about CCS programs. BHCS provides limited guidance and technical assistance as the result of deficiencies identified during on-site visits and makes referral to DCTS or other experts within the DHS for detail or ongoing technical assistance. BHCS issues certificates that identify the period within which the CCS may operate.

OIG

The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) prevents and detects fraud, waste, and abuse of public assistance programs administered by DHS.

Role of OIG for CCS: OIG audits providers who participate in Medicaid to ensure compliance with Medicaid rules and regulations. OIG reviews, monitors, and researches provider billing to detect and identify potential fraud, waste, and abuse.

Satisfaction survey materials

User's Guide for the Mental Health Statistical Improvement Program Participant Satisfaction Surveys, P-00887 (PDF)

CCS satisfaction surveys

These surveys are available in English, Spanish, and Hmong.

Data entry and reporting workbooks

Sample cover letters

Statewide meetings

Twice a year, DHS hosts a business and networking meeting for all stakeholders in the CCS Program. Materials from past meetings and information on future meetings.

Contact Langeston Hughes with questions or concerns regarding these meetings.

Training resources

DHS CCS staff contact information

Data and reports

View data and reports regarding the CCS program.

Children's system of care

Wisconsin's Children's System of Care for behavioral health blends the wraparound philosophy of Coordinated Services Teams Initiatives with CCS, resulting in a stronger, more sustainable network of quality services under a set of core values and principles. Visit the Wisconsin's Children's System of Care webpage for resources to transform local practices to meet the goals of this state initiative. 

 

Last Revised: October 5, 2020